ewer

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ew·er

 (yo͞o′ər)
n.
A pitcher, especially a decorative one with a base, an oval body, and a flaring spout.

[Middle English euer, from Anglo-Norman, from Vulgar Latin *aquāria, from Latin aquārius, of water, from aqua, water; see akw-ā- in Indo-European roots.]

ewer

(ˈjuːə)
n
a large jug or pitcher with a wide mouth
[C14: from Old French evier, from Latin aquārius water carrier, from aqua water]

ew•er

(ˈyu ər)

n.
1. a pitcher or jug with a wide spout.
2. a decorative vessel with a spout and handle, esp. a tall, slender one with a base.
[1275–1325; < Anglo-French; Old French evier < Latin aquārius vessel for water]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ewer - an open vessel with a handle and a spout for pouringewer - an open vessel with a handle and a spout for pouring
cream pitcher, creamer - a small pitcher for serving cream
vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)
Translations

ewer

[ˈjuːəʳ] Naguamanil m

ewer

[ˈjuːər] nbroc m

ewer

nWasserkrug m

ewer

[ˈjuːəʳ] n (old) → brocca
References in classic literature ?
A change had taken place in the weather the preceding evening, and a keen north-east wind, whistling through the crevices of our bedroom windows all night long, had made us shiver in our beds, and turned the contents of the ewers to ice.
Yes, he must bring out seats and food for both, and in serving us present not ewer and napkin with more show of respect to the one than to the other.
He must bring nothing outside; we will go in -- in among the dirt, and possibly other repulsive things, -- and take the food with the household, and after the fashion of the house, and all on equal terms, except the man be of the serf class; and finally, there will be no ewer and no napkin, whether he be serf or free.
D'Artagnan stopped to look at a sideboard on which was a superb ewer of silver.
Michael; besides which, the king, fifteen years afterward, gave him also this ewer and a sword which you may have seen formerly in my house, also a lovely specimen of workmanship.
The basin and the ewer had been smashed, the looking-glass was in fragments, and the sheets were in ribands.
Well, everything on this tray is at least a hundred years old: these cups, these spoons, this ewer, are all heirlooms; my great-grandmother left them to my grandmother, she to my mother, and my mother brought them with her from England to Switzerland, and left them to me; and, ever since I was a little girl, I have thought I should like to carry them back to England, whence they came.
A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewer and poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, and she drew a clean table beside them.
Through the open door you see a red-tiled floor, a large wooden bed, and on a deal table a ewer and a basin.
Four--an incense-boat, a ewer of silver, a gold buckle and a cope worked in pearls.
Three chairs and a couple of straw- bottomed armchairs stood about the room, and on a low chest of drawers in walnut wood stood a basin, and a ewer of obsolete pattern with a lid, which was kept in place by a leaden rim round the top of the vessel.
Ewers, in about 1940, collected a number of pencil and ink drawings by a young, talented Piegan artist named Calvin Boy.