ex silentio

ex silentio

(ɛks sɪˈlɛnʃɪˌəʊ)
adv, adj
(of a theory, assumption, etc) based on a lack of evidence to the contrary
[literally: from silence]
References in periodicals archive ?
Titled Venezia nel Oriente e Cipro, the music event will be staged by the internationally acclaimed Greek ensemble of early music Ex Silentio, aspiring to take the public on a journey to La Serenissima, with sounds of secular music from Renaissance Venice, including works by Willaert, Lasso and Strozzi.
The lack of older textual witnesses from Babylonia would support the interpretation that the text belonged to the body of secret knowledge (argumentum ex silentio).
Strickland's interpretation of Ameijeiixis suffers from argumentum ex silentio. The absence of violent crime on premises within two years was but a fact in the case, not a condition precedent to suit.
It is one thing to assert the oppressive existence of a male deity; this is a belief founded on faith, an ex silentio argument.
Third, Pasnau's reliance on early texts in Aquinas's career to buttress his interpretation, while dismissing later ones as ambiguous, seems to smack of argumentum ex silentio. There are certainly many texts indicating that Aquinas's intent is to be nonrepresentationalist.
However, lest the right argumentum ex silentio be forgotten, it is worth recalling how worldly some monks could be and what generally disastrous effects the monastic raids, dissolutions, and fires are likely to have had over a thousand years on all types of book in their libraries, moral or immoral.
Although there is some softening and shifting to be observed, the position he articulates here relies upon the suspect moves that vitiated his Samuel Johnson; these include a heavy dependence upon ex silentio and a priori argumentation.
The four-day festival goes back to the 18th century in Europe with the band Ex Silentio playinging on instruments from the time.
Even this, however, is an argument ex silentio. But where would this put the lndo-Aryans?
For this to be more than an elaborate argumentum ex silentio, Skinner must exhibit the use of the once-scorned techniques of ornatus in the later works.
Unfortunately, Foley's detailed points about 'new genres' (variously an Old English description of a retributive flood and a Serbian extempore verse about a photograph) rest on arguments ex silentio. David Megginson demolishes the hypothesis that late Old English poetry was composed in a special poetic dialect.