exactment

exactment

(ɪɡˈzæktmənt)
n
another word for exaction
References in periodicals archive ?
Education of and support for the way the people, both professional and amateur, who breed, care for, train and ride our horses is the only way to gain credence and respect for racing, and so in turn safeguard its future rather than undermining them with ill-considered overzealous regulation and exactment. Otherwise I fear racing will become little more than glorified gymkhanas or 'picnic' races.
"As if to demonstrate that the [McCray] decision had not been overturned in 1922," Lee notes, "the Supreme Court refused to hear a case ten years later involving a discriminatory tax on ticket scalping." (127) The Revenue Act of 1926 had retained a World War I era five percent excise on tickets to places of amusement, "but further provided for an exactment of 50 percent on the resale of tickets on the amount exceeding fifty cents over the price printed on the ticket." (128) In 1928 Congress raised the permissible mark-up from fifty to seventy-five cents.
Cardinal Silvio Oddi, Prefect of the Congregation of the Clergy, re-iterated this intent and its exactment in 1983 saying, "The Church no longer imposes punishments.