exceptive

Related to exceptive: receptive, acceptive

ex·cep·tive

 (ĭk-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, being, or containing an exception.
2. Archaic Captious; faultfinding.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exceptive

(ɪkˈsɛptɪv)
adj
relating to or forming an exception
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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granted exceptive relief by the SEC from complying with section 18, on
Thus, for Green, exceptive statements like the following are unacceptable in AAVE: Don't nobody ride bus #201--just the three people who live in the country.
In 1985, Joseph Davenport and his colleagues grappled with the controversial issues surrounding the concept of Andragogy, including differing philosophical orientations, the classification of Andragogy, and the general relevance of the term "adult education." They also looked at the exceptive spotlight on teaching and learning and discerning variations between Andragogy and Pedagogy.
Among the examples is the exceptive sensibility towards the losses, the tendency for status quo maintenance, not recognizing the sunk and the alternative expenses, the effect of possessing, the putting of frames, the mental reckonings, reading the relative instead the absolute assessments.
The 'exceptive arts', which for John consisted of nigromancia, aeromancia, pyromancia, ciromancia, geomancia, and ydromancia, combined possible divine, demonic, and ambiguous causation in what Fanger terms 'conceptual gradations of illicit magic' (p.
It is a universally quantified proposition that contains no exceptive clauses.
In the last decade, the mental representations underlying comprehension and reasoning from negative exceptive conditionals, such as the Spanish excepto si, salvo si (= English: except if), a no ser que, and a menos que (= English: unless), have attracted the attention of linguists (Dancygier & Sweetser, 2005; Declerk & Reed, 2000; Lycan, 2001, Montolio, 2000), philosophers (Fillenbaum, 1986; Reichenbach, 1947; Quine, 1972) and cognitive psychologists (Espino, Sanchez-Curbelo, Garcia, & Estupinan, 2013; Garcia-Madruga, Carriedo, Moreno-Rios, Gutierrez, & Schaeken, 2008; Garcia-Madruga, Carriedo, & Moreno-Rios, 2011; Garcia-Madruga, Gutierrez, Carriedo, Moreno-Rios, & Johnson-Laird, 2002; Gomez-Veiga, Garcia-Madruga, & MorenoRios, 2012).
In this paper, we will focus on how people understand and think with the exceptive conditional, found in constructions such as 'the women can take this drug except if she is allergic to the penicillin'.
Basically, article 6/4 is an exceptive clause: "If, in spite of a negative assessment of the implications for the site and in the absence of alternative solutions, a plan or project must nevertheless be carried out for imperative reasons of overriding public interest, including those of a social or economic nature, the Member State shall take all compensatory measures necessary to ensure that the overall coherence of Natura 2000 is protected" (emphasis added).
There are several exceptive cases that can impact OWKNN's effectiveness.
As the two potential mechanisms are not exceptive, it is possible that only complex protective approach will be able to effectively prevent myoblasts' death after transplantation.