calcium

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cal·ci·um

 (kăl′sē-əm)
n. Symbol Ca
A silvery, moderately hard alkaline-earth metal that constitutes approximately 3.6 percent of the earth's crust and is a basic component of most animals and plants. It occurs naturally in limestone, gypsum, and fluorite, and its compounds are used to make plaster, quicklime, Portland cement, and metallurgic and electronic materials. Atomic number 20; atomic weight 40.08; melting point 842°C; boiling point 1,484°C; specific gravity 1.54; valence 2. See Periodic Table.

[Latin calx, calc-, lime; see calx + -ium.]

calcium

(ˈkælsɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a malleable silvery-white metallic element of the alkaline earth group; the fifth most abundant element in the earth's crust (3.6 per cent), occurring esp as forms of calcium carbonate. It is an essential constituent of bones and teeth and is used as a deoxidizer in steel. Symbol: Ca; atomic no: 20; atomic wt: 40.078; valency: 2; relative density: 1.55; melting pt: 842±2°C; boiling pt: 1494°C
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin calx lime]

cal•ci•um

(ˈkæl si əm)

n.
a silver-white divalent metal, combined in limestone, chalk, etc., occurring also in animals in bone, shell, etc. Symbol: Ca; at. wt.: 40.08; at. no.: 20; sp. gr.: 1.55 at 20°C.
[1808; < Latin calc-, s. of calx lime, limestone + New Latin -ium -ium2]

cal·ci·um

(kăl′sē-əm)
Symbol Ca A silvery-white, moderately hard metallic element that is an alkaline-earth metal and occurs in minerals such as limestone and gypsum. It is a basic component of leaves, bones, teeth, and shells, and is essential for the normal growth and development of most animals and plants. Calcium is used to make plaster, cement, and alloys. Atomic number 20. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calcium - a white metallic element that burns with a brilliant lightcalcium - a white metallic element that burns with a brilliant light; the fifth most abundant element in the earth's crust; an important component of most plants and animals
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
fluor, fluorite, fluorspar - a soft mineral (calcium fluoride) that is fluorescent in ultraviolet light; chief source of fluorine
gypsum - a common white or colorless mineral (hydrated calcium sulphate) used to make cements and plasters (especially plaster of Paris)
burnt lime, calcined lime, calcium oxide, calx, fluxing lime, quicklime, unslaked lime, lime - a white crystalline oxide used in the production of calcium hydroxide
limestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animals
calcium ion, factor IV - ion of calcium; a factor in the clotting of blood
Translations
فِلِز الكِلْسكَالْسِيُوم
калций
vápník
calciumkalcium
kalcio
kaltsium
kalsium
kalcij
kalcium
kalsínkalsíum
カルシウム
칼슘
kalcis
kalcijs
calciu
vápnikvápník
kalcij
kalcium
แคลเซียม
canxi

calcium

[ˈkælsɪəm]
A. Ncalcio m
B. CPD calcium carbonate Ncarbonato m de calcio
calcium chloride Ncloruro m de calcio

calcium

[ˈkælsɪəm] ncalcium m

calcium

nKalzium nt, → Calcium nt

calcium

[ˈkælsɪəm] n (Chem) → calcio

calcium

(ˈkӕlsiəm) noun
an element of which one compound (calcium carbonate) forms limestone, chalk etc.

calcium

كَالْسِيُوم vápník calcium Kalzium ασβέστιο calcio kalsium calcium kalcij calcio カルシウム 칼슘 calcium kalsium wapń cálcio кальций kalcium แคลเซียม kalsiyum canxi

cal·ci·um

n. calcio, sustancia mineral necesaria en el desarrollo de los huesos y tejidos;
___ carbonatecarbonato cálcico.

calcium

n calcio; — carbonate carbonato cálcico or de calcio; — gluconate gluconato de calcio
References in periodicals archive ?
The excess calcium can be deposited in and damage the kidneys, and excessive intake of vitamin D can also encourage calcium to be removed from bones, which can soften and weaken them the opposite of what is trying to be achieved.
The age-dependent changes in voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC) of the cell membrane, which regulate calcium entry upon neuronal depolarization, include two phenomena that lead to excess calcium entering the neuron.
Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, advisory board member of the Nutritional Magnesium Association, explains: "When people consume too much calcium without sufficient magnesium, not only will it create stress within the body but the excess calcium will not be utilized correctly and may become toxic, because magnesium is essential for the absorption and metabolism of calcium and vitamin D.
If any excess calcium is absorbed, the kidneys remove it from the blood and excrete it in the urine.
This is because it's not altogether clear that excess calcium is deposited in the arteries, though the conclusion seems logical enough because the bones have limited ability to absorb calcium given in larger doses than those found in foods, and because we do see evidence of calcium building up in arteries and in arterial plaques.
An accumulation of excess calcium can cause potentially deadly calcifications in tissues and blood vessels; however, physicians currently have no tools to determine an individual's calcification risk.
Assuming that excess calcium intake without regards to magnesium intake may increase heart attack and stroke risk, this may indeed validate what Life Extension[R] has long espoused about the critical need to balance calcium and magnesium.
On the other hand, excess calcium without its above co-helpers can result in calcium settling in soft tissue in different body parts (joints, blood vessels), causing arthritis and artery stiffening.
If there's excess calcium in our blood not being assimilated into the bones, guess what happens to it?
For example, cheap high-sulphur coal or coke could be co-fired with the shale so that the excess calcium be used to trap sulphur, while leaving more shale for other applications and the future.
The excess calcium got deposited in various parts of Shailesh's body and had to be taken out every month.
For investigators of calcium sensor proteins the reduction of affinity due to added calcium might be surprising, as the general knowledge is that excess calcium has to be used.