excess demand


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excess demand

n
(Economics) economics a situation in which the market demand for a commodity is greater than its market supply, thus causing its market price to rise
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The 23-year-old property developer has filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) a prospectus for the offering of up to 2.7 billion primary shares plus an extra allotment of up to 300 million shares in case of excess demand.
Average yields per acre of vineyard were up 97 per cent last year, and the Kent-based company secured more than double the volume of fruit in good condition which allowed it to build stocks and "satisfy the excess demand" for its wine.
Governor Mark Carney upgraded expectations for growth and said that unemployment would drop further and the economy would generate more excess demand than previously predicted.
To prevent inflation, we need to ensure that employment is provided to produce the goods for which we anticipate excess demand will be generated, eg if we forecast additional demand for a million tonnes of food, we must employ the labourers to produce the additional million.
In the merchant market (in both spot and forward segment), there was an excess demand in the range of USD 9-14 billion since February 2018.
There is surely always excess demand on the part of workers from lower-income countries to migrate to high-income or dynamic middle-income countries.
The fund closed within two months due to Excess demand.
Hence, they have sustained demand for funds that would translate into lower excess demand in the system," he said.
What has happened is that some of these economies now have excess demand to deal with, excess demand from both the external and domestic sectors.
The automaker is taking this step to increase the production of mid-size trucks in order to meet the excess demand for Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon pickups.
"There hasn't been excess supply or excess demand in the market, indicating stability has returned" since the measures were introduced on 13 February, said David Adepoju, President of the Financial Markets Dealers Association, the parent organization of the FMDQ.
Instead, many higher-education institutions (HEIs) limit the number of available slots to guarantee permanent excess demand. The same phenomenon can be observed in other markets, especially service markets, but the rationale behind excess demand in higher education does not apply to restaurants or large events.