exchanged


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ex·change

 (ĭks-chānj′)
v. ex·changed, ex·chang·ing, ex·chang·es
v.tr.
1. To give in return for something received; trade: exchange dollars for francs; exchanging labor for room and board.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: exchange gifts; exchange ideas.
3. To give up for a substitute: exchange a position in the private sector for a post in government.
4. To turn in for replacement: exchange defective merchandise at a store.
v.intr.
1. To give something in return for something received; make an exchange.
2. To be received in exchange: At that time the British pound exchanged for $2.80.
n.
1. The act or an instance of exchanging: a prisoner exchange; an exchange of greetings.
2. One that is exchanged.
3. A place or network for exchanging things, especially a center where securities or commodities are bought and sold.
4. A telephone exchange.
5.
a. A system of payments using instruments, such as negotiable drafts, instead of money.
b. The fee or percentage charged for participating in such a system of payment.
6. A bill of exchange.
7. A rate of exchange.
8. The amount of difference in the actual value of two or more currencies or between values of the same currency at two or more places.
9. A dialogue: a heated exchange between the two in-laws.
adj.
Of or relating to a reciprocal arrangement between a local and a foreign institution or group: an exchange student; exchange programs for students learning foreign languages.

[Middle English eschaungen, from Anglo-Norman eschaungier, from Vulgar Latin *excambiāre : Latin ex-, ex- + Late Latin cambīre, to exchange, barter; see change.]

ex·change′a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exchanged - changed for (replaced by) something different
changed - made or become different in nature or form; "changed attitudes"; "changed styles of dress"; "a greatly changed country after the war"
References in classic literature ?
The uses of every possession are two, both dependent upon the thing itself, but not in the same manner, the one supposing an inseparable connection with it, the other not; as a shoe, for instance, which may be either worn, or exchanged for something else, both these are the uses of the shoe; for he who exchanges a shoe with some man who wants one, for money or provisions, uses the shoe as a shoe, but not according to the original intention, for shoes were not at first made to be exchanged.
Had the men been strangers, and therefore unable to exchange names, they would have silently exchanged ornaments, had their missions been peaceful--otherwise they would have exchanged shots, or have fought out their introduction with some other of their various weapons.
Tars Tarkas and the chief exchanged a few words, and the former, calling to a young female among the throng, gave her some instructions and motioned me to accompany her.
At a certain stage in the development of these means of production and of exchange, the conditions under which feudal society produced and exchanged, the feudal organisation of agriculture and manufacturing industry, in one word, the feudal relations of property became no longer compatible with the already developed productive forces; they became so many fetters.
The countess exchanged glances with Anna Mikhaylovna.
In either case it would be enough if we exchanged addresses, at which we could write to each other in case of need.
Simpson was absent from the home circle for the moment because he had exchanged the Widow Rideout's sleigh for Joseph Goodwin's plough.
Mother," said Rogojin, kissing her hand, "here is my great friend, Prince Muishkin; we have exchanged crosses; he was like a real brother to me at Moscow at one time, and did a great deal for me.