excretion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to excretion: kidney, Excretory system

ex·cre·tion

 (ĭk-skrē′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of discharging waste matter from the blood, tissues, or organs.
2. The matter, such as urine or sweat, that is so excreted.

ex•cre•tion

(ɪkˈskri ʃən)

n.
1. the act of excreting.
2. a substance excreted, as urine or sweat, or certain plant products.
[1595–1605]

ex·cre·tion

(ĭk-skrē′shən)
The elimination by an organism of waste products, such as carbon dioxide and urea, resulting from metabolic processes. Higher animals have specific organs of excretion, such as the lungs and kidneys. In plants and many lower organisms, waste is eliminated by diffusion to the outside environment.

excrete verb

excretion

the natural process of eliminating bodily wastes in the feces and urine.
See also: Bodily Functions

excretion

1. The removal of the waste products of cell metabolism.
2. The removal of feces, urine, and other wastes from the body via the colon, kidneys, lungs, or skin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excretion - the bodily process of discharging waste matterexcretion - the bodily process of discharging waste matter
defecation, laxation, shitting - the elimination of fecal waste through the anus
expelling, discharge, emission - any of several bodily processes by which substances go out of the body; "the discharge of pus"
incontinence, incontinency - involuntary urination or defecation
micturition, urination - the discharge of urine
2.excretion - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the bodyexcretion - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the body
faecal matter, faeces, fecal matter, feces, ordure, BM, dejection, stool - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
fecula - excreta (especially of insects)
wormcast - cylindrical mass of earth voided by a burrowing earthworm or lugworm
human waste - the body wastes of human beings
pee, piddle, urine, weewee, water - liquid excretory product; "there was blood in his urine"; "the child had to make water"
barf, vomit, vomitus, puke - the matter ejected in vomiting
waste, waste material, waste matter, waste product - any materials unused and rejected as worthless or unwanted; "they collect the waste once a week"; "much of the waste material is carried off in the sewers"
guano - the excrement of sea birds; used as fertilizer

excretion

noun
The act or process of discharging bodily wastes or foreign substances:
Medicine: catharsis.
Translations
إخْراج، إبْراز غائِط
sekretionudskillelse
kiválasztódás
úrgangsefni
boşaltmaçıkarma

excretion

[eksˈkriːʃən] N (= act) → excreción f; (= substance) → excremento m

excretion

[ɪkˈskriːʃən] n [faeces, urine, sweat] → excrétion f; [drug] → excrétion f

excretion

n (= act)Ausscheidung f, → Exkretion f; (= substance)Exkret nt

excretion

[ɪksˈkriːʃn] n (frm) → escrezione f

excrete

(ikˈskriːt) verb
to discharge (waste matter) from the body.
exˈcretion (-ʃən) noun

ex·cre·tion

n. excreción, expulsión de lo secretado.
References in classic literature ?
Natural selection will produce nothing in one species for the exclusive good or injury of another; though it may well produce parts, organs, and excretions highly useful or even indispensable, or highly injurious to another species, but in all cases at the same time useful to the owner.
The literature available on pharmacokinetics and excretion of cefixime in young and local population is scanty.
The primary efficacy endpoint for URIROX-2 is the percent change from baseline in 24-hour urinary oxalate, or UOx, excretion measured during weeks 1-4, the same primary efficacy endpoint as URIROX-1.
Due to the lack of nitrogen, MHA receives a nitrogen atom in the liver and transforms it into L-methionine, a process that could reduce the urinary excretion of nitrogen (ammonia), thus lowering the urine buffering capacity (MARTIN-VENEGAS et al., 2006).
An alternative is to measure salt excretion in urine.
The amount of creatinine excreted over 24 h is a reflection of skeletal muscle (SM) mass (1, 2), and the expected excretion rate is at least 15 mg [kg.sup.-1] [day.sup.-1] in healthy women and the same or higher in healthy men.
The researchers observed direct relations to BP for 24-hour urinary sodium excretion and the urinary sodium/potassium ratio among 4,680 men and women aged 40 to 59 years of age, with control for multiple non-dietary factors, but not body mass index.
A study by US researchers showed that patients with the lowest levels of urine ammonium excretion had a 46 per cent higher risk of dying or needing dialysis, and those with intermediate levels had a 14 per cent higher risk, irrespective of serum bicarbonate concentration.
Following phosphate intake, the bone secretes the peptide hormone FGF23, which acts on the kidney to induce urinary phosphate excretion, thereby maintaining the phosphate balance.
Cluster analysis may assist in the identification of these BP phenotypes and provide an insight to better understand the complex relationship between BP and sodium and potassium excretion in real-life settings.
The impaired AVP regulation leads to a reduction of free water excretion with following hypotonic hyponatremia [4, 5].