excusable


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ex·cuse

(ĭk-skyo͞oz′)
tr.v. ex·cused, ex·cus·ing, ex·cus·es
1.
a. To make allowance for; overlook or forgive: Please excuse the interruption.
b. To grant pardon to; forgive: We quickly excused the latecomer.
2.
a. To apologize for (oneself) for an act that could cause offense: She excused herself for being late.
b. To explain (a fault or offense) in the hope of being forgiven or understood; try to justify: He arrived late and excused his tardiness by blaming it on the traffic. See Synonyms at forgive.
3. To serve as justification for: Witty talk does not excuse bad manners.
4. To free, as from an obligation or duty; exempt: She was excused from jury duty because she knew the plaintiff.
5. To give permission to leave; release: The child ate quickly and asked to be excused.
n. (ĭk-skyo͞os′)
1. An explanation offered to justify or obtain forgiveness.
2. A reason or grounds for excusing: Ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.
3. The act of excusing.
4. A note explaining an absence.
5. Informal An inferior example: a poor excuse for a poet; a sorry excuse for a car.
Idiom:
Excuse me
1. Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
2. Used to request that a statement be repeated.

[Middle English excusen, ultimately (partly via Old French excuser) from Latin excūsāre : ex-, ex- + causa, lawsuit; see cause.]

ex·cus′a·ble adj.
ex·cus′a·ble·ness n.
ex·cus′a·bly adv.
ex·cus′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.excusable - capable of being overlooked
inexcusable - without excuse or justification
2.excusable - easily excused or forgiven; "a venial error"
pardonable - admitting of being pardoned

excusable

adjective forgivable, understandable, justifiable, permissible, minor, slight, allowable, defensible, venial, pardonable, warrantable He had made a simple but excusable mistake.

excusable

adjective
1. Admitting of forgiveness or pardon:
2. Capable of being justified:
Translations
يُغْتَفَر، قابِل للعُذر
forståelig
megbocsátható
afsakanlegur
affedilebilirbağışlanabilir

excusable

[ɪksˈkjuːzəbl] ADJperdonable, disculpable

excusable

[ɪkˈskjuːzəbəl] adjexcusable

excusable

excusable

[ɪksˈkjuːzəbl] adjscusabile, perdonabile

excuse

(ikˈskjuːz) verb
1. to forgive or pardon. Excuse me – can you tell me the time?; I'll excuse your carelessness this time.
2. to free (someone) from a task, duty etc. May I be excused from writing this essay?
(ikˈskjuːs) noun
a reason (given by oneself) for being excused, or a reason for excusing. He has no excuse for being so late.
excusable (ikˈskjuːzəbl) adjective
pardonable.
References in classic literature ?
A little delay on his side might be very excusable.
Kutuzov was a traitor, and Prince Vasili during the visits of condolence paid to him on the occasion of his daughter's death said of Kutuzov, whom he had formerly praised (it was excusable for him in his grief to forget what he had said), that it was impossible to expect anything else from a blind and depraved old man.
There were now clearly so many of these for my poor colleague that she was excusable for being vague.
We are excusable for getting a little tangled as to time.
Perjury, oppression, subornation, fraud, pandarism, and the like infirmities, were among the most excusable arts they had to mention; and for these I gave, as it was reasonable, great allowance.
Sigurd was greatly surprised to hear his Queen scold him so much, for she had never said an angry word to him before; but he thought it was quite excusable in this case, and tried to quiet the child along with her, but it was no use.
And on the strength of peccadillos, reprehensible in an author, but excusable in a son, the Anglo-Saxon race is accused of prudishness, humbug, pretentiousness, deceit, cunning, and bad cooking.
I hope, sir," said he to Jones, "you will not from this accident conclude, that I make a custom of striking my servants, for I assure you this is the first time I have been guilty of it in my remembrance, and I have passed by many provoking faults in this very fellow, before he could provoke me to it; but when you hear what hath happened this evening, you will, I believe, think me excusable.
Don't be flurried, my dear,' replied Mrs Nickleby, looking towards the garden-wall, 'for you see I'm not, and if it would be excusable in anybody to be flurried, it certainly would--under all the circumstances--be excusable in me, but I am not, Kate--not at all.
By my faith, 'twould be excusable in him to tremble," replied Aramis, "for even I feel a shudder at the recollection; hold, just above that tree is the little spot where I thought I was killed.
We misunderstood each other: he believed me more to blame than I really was; I considered his interference less excusable than I now find it.
But we were alone, and I thought that the circumstances might make it excusable.