execration


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ex·e·cra·tion

 (ĕk′sĭ-krā′shən)
n.
1. The act of cursing.
2. A curse.
3. Something that is cursed or loathed.

ex•e•cra•tion

(ˌɛk sɪˈkreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of execrating.
2. a curse or imprecation.
3. the object execrated; a thing held in abomination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.execration - hate coupled with disgustexecration - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
2.execration - an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil on someone or some group
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
anathema - a formal ecclesiastical curse accompanied by excommunication
imprecation, malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult); "he suffered the imprecations of the mob"
3.execration - the object of cursing or detestation; that which is execrated
object - the focus of cognitions or feelings; "objects of thought"; "the object of my affection"

execration

noun
1. A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
2. An object of extreme dislike:
Informal: horror.
Translations

execration

[ˌeksɪˈkreɪʃən] N (frm) → execración f (frm), abominación f (frm)

execration

n
(= hatred)Abscheu m
(= curse)Fluch m, → Verwünschung f

execration

[ˌɛksɪˈkreɪʃn] n (frm) → esecrazione f
References in classic literature ?
So with a muttered execration I left the fellow to his fate, and clapping spurs to my own horse, galloped away, excited by a combination of feelings it would not be easy to analyse; and perhaps, if I did so, the result would not be very creditable to my disposition; for I am not sure that a species of exultation in what I had done was not one principal concomitant.
It was as the ass and the lap-dog; yet surely the gentle ass whose intentions were affectionate, although his manners were rude, deserved better treatment than blows and execration.
The crowd had been hushed during these few moments, watching his motions and doubtful of his purpose, but the instant they perceived it and knew it was defeated, they raised a cry of triumphant execration to which all their previous shouting had been whispers.
It was sufficient to know that while they were proceeding, the concourse without still lingered round the house; that boys beat upon the drum with their fists, and imitated Punch with their tender voices; that the office-window was rendered opaque by flattened noses, and the key-hole of the street-door luminous with eyes; that every time the single gentleman or either of his guests was seen at the upper window, or so much as the end of one of their noses was visible, there was a great shout of execration from the excluded mob, who remained howling and yelling, and refusing consolation, until the exhibitors were delivered up to them to be attended elsewhere.
exclaimed the Templar; ``deliver up our prisoners, and stand an object alike of ridicule and execration, as the doughty warriors who dared by a night-attack to possess themselves of the persons of a party of defenceless travellers, yet could not make good a strong castle against a vagabond troop of outlaws, led by swineherds, jesters, and the very refuse of mankind?
Felton only expressed, with regard to the duke, the feeling of execration which all the English had declared toward him whom the Catholics themselves called the extortioner, the pillager, the debauchee, and whom the Puritans styled simply Satan.
two or three stories,) wide, neat, and free from any quaintness of architectural ornamentation; locust trees bordering the sidewalks (they call them acacias;) a stirring, business-look about the streets and the stores; fast walkers; a familiar new look about the houses and every thing; yea, and a driving and smothering cloud of dust that was so like a message from our own dear native land that we could hardly refrain from shedding a few grateful tears and execrations in the old time-honored American way.
So soon as he recovered himself, the poor little negro was assailed by yells and execrations from the crew.
Oaths, threats, and execrations, were vented on all sides.
He carried her in; I followed, grumbling execrations and vengeance.
The very devil would be in it in that case," said Sancho; and letting off thirty "ohs," and sixty sighs, and a hundred and twenty maledictions and execrations on whomsoever it was that had brought him there, he raised himself, stopping half-way bent like a Turkish bow without power to bring himself upright, but with all his pains he saddled his ass, who too had gone astray somewhat, yielding to the excessive licence of the day; he next raised up Rocinante, and as for him, had he possessed a tongue to complain with, most assuredly neither Sancho nor his master would have been behind him.
The squire no sooner heard of his arrival, than he stept aside, by his sister's advice, to give his daughter orders for the proper reception of her lover: which he did with the most bitter execrations and denunciations of judgment on her refusal.