exegesis

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Related to exegeses: eisegesis, Biblical exegesis

ex·e·ge·sis

 (ĕk′sə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. ex·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
Critical explanation or analysis, especially of a text.

[Greek exēgēsis, from exēgeisthai, to interpret : ex-, ex- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′e·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk), ex′e·get′i·cal adj.
ex′e·get′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exegesis

(ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) explanation or critical interpretation of a text, esp of the Bible. Compare eisegesis
[C17: from Greek, from exēgeisthai to interpret, from ex-1 + hēgeisthai to guide]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•e•ge•sis

(ˌɛk sɪˈdʒi sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
critical explanation or interpretation, esp. of Scripture.
[1610–20; < Greek exḗgēsis an interpretation =exēgē-, variant s. of exēgeîsthai to show the way, interpret]
ex`e•get′ic (-ˈdʒɛt ɪk) ex`e•get′i•cal, adj.
ex`e•get′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

exegesis

a critical interpretation or explication, especially of biblical and other religious texts. — exegetic, exegetical, adj.
See also: Criticism
critical explication or interpretation of Scripture.
See also: Bible
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exegesis - an explanation or critical interpretation (especially of the Bible)
Christian Bible, Good Book, Holy Scripture, Holy Writ, Scripture, Bible, Word of God, Book, Word - the sacred writings of the Christian religions; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen"
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

exegesis

noun explanation, interpretation, clarification, exposition, explication a substantial exegesis of his work
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

exegesis

noun
1. Critical explanation or analysis:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
egzegeza

exegesis

[ˌeksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] N (exegeses (pl)) [ˌeksɪˈdʒiːsiːz]exégesis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

exegesis

[ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] [exegeses] [ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsiːz] (pl) nexégèse f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

exegesis

nExegese f, → Auslegung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

exegesis

[ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs] n (frm) → esegesi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
He said there has been a debate on how to interpret the Quranic text and the numerous commentaries and exegeses since the early period of Islamic history were a testimony to it.
Protestations that the project is directed at disbelievers, rather than reassuring spiritually colonized believers of the scientific bases of their faith, ignore the fact that disbelievers have no need for such exegeses; the explanatory power of modern scientific discoveries is derived elsewhere.
surveys rabbinic, patristic, medieval, and Reformation exegeses. He points out that, contrary to the modern assumption, the problems taken up by feminist exegetes have been recognized and struggled with for centuries.
Several articles posit social history behind particular exegeses, modeling well Wilken's own work on John Chrysostom.