exegetical


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to exegetical: pedagogical, Exegetical Theology

ex·e·ge·sis

 (ĕk′sə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. ex·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
Critical explanation or analysis, especially of a text.

[Greek exēgēsis, from exēgeisthai, to interpret : ex-, ex- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′e·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk), ex′e·get′i·cal adj.
ex′e·get′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exegetical - relating to exegesis
Translations

exegetical

adjexegetisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Exegetical Crossroads: Understanding Scripture in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the Pre-Modern Orient
The project will thereby put forward a pioneering proof of concept for an integrative exegetical approach capable of addressing three core dimensions of the quran: The compositional structure of quranic texts, The intricate processes of literary growth and redactional expansion by which many of them have been shaped, And the theological concerns governing the qurans appropriation of antecedent (especially jewish and christian) ideas, Traditions, And literary forms.
In chapter one the author provides a detailed introduction summarizing previous studies of the figure of David in Islamic literature, giving a valuable overview of the genre of tafsir, or the classical exegetical tradition expounding Quran, and explaining the organizational principles behind his presentation of interpreters in the remainder of the work.
Augustine in particular contributed to this heightened concern with his exegetical treatment of the Psalms, Enarrationes in Psalmos.
Kienzle refers to her exegetical method as 'intratextual glossing', a form of progressive commentary through which the speaker follows the Gospel text word by word, and inserts into it a running commentary that provides her spiritual interpretation of the text.
To this end she enlists all of Radak's known biblical exegesis, and undertakes a systematic comparison between his commentaries and his exegetical sources.
Understanding participant-reference shifts in the book of Jeremiah; a study of exegetical method and its consequences for the interpretation of referential incoherence.
Brueggemann provides incisive exegetical comments on prayers by eleven men and one woman from the Old Testament.
The "discussion of Donne's study of the Hebrew Bible," she suggests first, "must include an investigation into the complex Jewish exegetical tradition, as well as into its direct and indirect Christian transmission" (3).
This section is followed by exegetical explanations (al-nusus al-tafsiriyya), once again based comprehensively on fourteen centuries of Islamic reflection and scholarship.
THUS, Ilana Pardes's Melville's Bibles, which examines the contemporary exegetical context of five key Old Testament figures in Moby-Dick (Job, Noah, Ishmael, Ahab, and Rachel), is an overdue reminder of the critical role of the Bible in Melville's whaling novel and in nineteenth-century American culture generally.