exhaustibility


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ex·haust

 (ĭg-zôst′)
v. ex·haust·ed, ex·haust·ing, ex·hausts
v.tr.
1. To make extremely weary; wear out. See Synonyms at tire1.
2.
a. To remove a resource from; deplete: tobacco crops that exhausted the soil of nutrients.
b. To use up completely: a costly project that exhausted our funds. See Synonyms at deplete.
3. To discuss or treat completely; cover thoroughly: exhaust a topic.
4.
a. To let out the contents of (a container); cause or allow to escape: a leak that exhausted the air tank.
b. To let out or draw off (a gas, for example) from a container.
v.intr.
To escape or pass out: Steam exhausts through this valve.
n.
1.
a. The escape or release of vaporous waste material, as from an engine.
b. The fumes or gases so released.
2. A duct or pipe through which waste material is emitted.
3. An apparatus for drawing out noxious air or waste material by means of a partial vacuum.

[Latin exhaurīre, exhaust- : ex-, ex- + haurīre, to draw.]

ex·haust′ed·ly adv.
ex·haust′er n.
ex·haust′i·bil′i·ty n.
ex·haust′i·ble adj.
ex·haust′ing·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a macro-fiscal perspective, exhaustibility and price volatility of natural resources will gain special importance for fiscal policy formulation," the paper said.
As Bratland (2008) argues, resource exhaustibility is a specifically entrepreneurial problem, because "resources" have little economic meaning without reference to an entrepreneurial plan.
It has been a race between the exhaustibility of resources and innovation, and so far innovation has won," Buiter said.