exhilaration


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Related to exhilaration: prerequisites

ex·hil·a·ra·tion

 (ĭg-zĭl′ə-rā′shən)
n.
The state of being stimulated, refreshed, or elated: "Few Yosemite visitors ever see snow avalanches and fewer still know the exhilaration of riding on them" (John Muir).

ex•hil•a•ra•tion

(ɪgˌzɪl əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. exhilarated condition or feeling.
2. the act of exhilarating.
[1615–25; < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exhilaration - the feeling of lively and cheerful joyexhilaration - the feeling of lively and cheerful joy; "he could hardly conceal his excitement when she agreed"
joy, joyfulness, joyousness - the emotion of great happiness
thrill, kick, boot, bang, flush, rush, charge - the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks"
intoxication - excitement and elation beyond the bounds of sobriety; "the intoxication of wealth and power"
titillation - a tingling feeling of excitement (as from teasing or tickling)

exhilaration

exhilaration

noun
Translations
إبْتِهاج، نَشْوَه
glædeopstemthed
kæti, glaîværî, hressing

exhilaration

[ɪgˌzɪləˈreɪʃən] N (= elation) → alegría f, regocijo m; (= excitement) → excitación f
the exhilaration of speedlo emocionante de la velocidad

exhilaration

[ɪgˌzɪləˈreɪʃən] neuphorie f, ivresse f

exhilaration

nHochgefühl nt; the exhilaration of flyingdas Hochgefühl beim Fliegen

exhilaration

[ɪgˌzɪləˈreɪʃn] nallegria

exhilarate

(igˈziləreit) verb
to make (a person) feel happy and lively. He was exhilarated by the walk.
exˌhilaˈration noun
exˈhilarating adjective
an exhilarating walk.
References in classic literature ?
No, that is probably not true; one thinks he would not look if he knew what was coming, but the interest and the excitement are so powerful that they would doubtless conquer all other feelings; and so, under the fierce exhilaration of the clashing steel, he would yield and look after all.
into a stillness, a pause of all life, that had nothing to do with the more or less noise that at the moment we might be engaged in making and that I could hear through any deepened exhilaration or quickened recitation or louder strum of the piano.
Notwithstanding this accidental introduction to one of the nicest distinctions of good society, and the general exhilaration that prevailed in our party, I was far from being perfectly happy.
The sky was bright blue, and the trees in the avenue through which they passed were thick with leaves; there was something in the air fresh to Philip, and mingled with the timidity he felt at entering on a new life, among strangers, was a great exhilaration.
Refreshed, delighted, invigorated, I walked along, forgetting all my cares, feeling as if I had wings to my feet, and could go at least forty miles without fatigue, and experiencing a sense of exhilaration to which I had been an entire stranger since the days of early youth.
Anne's eyes shone all that day; literary ambitions sprouted and budded in her brain; their exhilaration accompanied her to Jennie Cooper's walking party, and not even the sight of Gilbert and Christine, walking just ahead of her and Roy, could quite subdue the sparkle of her starry hopes.
I had, withal, a sense of exhilaration and vigor altogether unknown to me--a feeling of mental and physical exaltation.
I achieved a false exhilaration, drugged myself to merriment.
I have just received my dispatches, and taken my farewell of Allenham; and by way of exhilaration I am now come to take my farewell of you.
Her paroxysms of exhilaration, followed by a gnawing sense of failure and uselessness, were known to her mother only as "wildness" and "low spirits," to be combated by needlework as a sedative, or beef tea as a stimulant.
They merged at last into a kind of hysterical exhilaration.
The feeling of freshness and exhilaration which the cool waters had imparted to him, filled his little being with grateful surprise, and ever after he lost no opportunity to take a daily plunge in lake or stream or ocean when it was possible to do so.