exhortative


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Related to exhortative: Hortation

ex·hor·ta·tive

 (ĭg-zôr′tə-tĭv) also ex·hor·ta·to·ry (-tôr′ē)
adj.
Acting or intended to encourage, incite, or advise.

ex•hort•a•tive

(ɪgˈzɔr tə tɪv)

also ex•hort•a•to•ry

(ɪgˈzɔr təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

adj.
1. serving or intended to exhort.
2. pertaining to exhortation.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
ex•hort′a•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exhortative - giving strong encouragement
encouraging - giving courage or confidence or hope; "encouraging advances in medical research"
References in periodicals archive ?
The recent State of the Nation Address used colorful words such as 'self-purgation' and 'catharsis.' To the average listener, such exhortative words may come across as mere rhetoric-delivering shock value but nothing more.
Thirdly, it is appropriate to correlate originality with the theological and exhortative intentions, expressed through the urges to perseverance and fidelity.
exhortative most of these provisions are, it seems unlikely that even a
The power of exemplarity in Roman historiography, then, was used by the historians not only as a pedagogical rhetorical device to explain or illustrate the situation that was being narrated, but also as an exhortative encouragement to motivate readers into action.
When confronted by this question, the line of argument of La forma adopts an exhortative and ironic register.
ii) Imperfect indicative with exhortative function (s'assittasse, taliasse, mi scusasse).
Brutus receives exhortative anonymous letters which are meant to make him join the republican conspiracy against Caesar.
Esrefoglu's poetry is alternately confessional and exhortative, exuberant and sober.
Beginning with the exhortative first line of "Campo I" (and hence the opening of the manuscript)--"[??]Ese camino real abandonado!"--these poems represent the countryside of yore as a space of forsaken authenticity, as if rural paths were worthier roads not taken and now forever lost.
What the literary critics have told us about mythic literature says much about exhortative discourse, and, from the point of view of rhetoric, I do not think it a mere piety but rather the exact truth to observe that one who has surrendered [oneself] to a masterwork of mythic fiction has become thereby a different [person], for the work has quite literally persuaded [her/him] (35).
This treatise has been rendered into present-day Spanish, while preserving the exhortative nature of Knox's discourse, particularly observable in long sentences with various subordinates and parenthetical remarks and the profusion of rhetorical questions and exclamations.
789, 798 (1984) (arguing that the value of the duty of care is in its "socializing and exhortative impact").