exhortatory


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ex·hor·ta·tive

 (ĭg-zôr′tə-tĭv) also ex·hor·ta·to·ry (-tôr′ē)
adj.
Acting or intended to encourage, incite, or advise.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exhortatory - giving strong encouragement
encouraging - giving courage or confidence or hope; "encouraging advances in medical research"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is with those 10 terrorists that 'Hotel Mumbai' starts, showing them arriving at the city's edge on November 26 in a small fishing boat listening to an exhortatory taped message made by their never-seen leader: "You feel strong.
Though the work of the National Commission was widely hailed and even implemented to varying degrees, its suggestions were still largely seen as "exhortatory" (Stevenson & Schiller, 1999, p.
Much of The Joyful Mystery is written not in the standard philosophical vein of analysis and conclusion, but in an exhortatory, beautifully poetic--sometimes teetering on purple--prose that is designed to inspire ivory-tower and sacristy rats to find God in the creation that God has promised will, when human redemption is complete, again be experienced as a temple:
(50) Criticism has tended to read the play as an extension of the exhortatory polemic of the 1580s and 90s that cautioned England against the military threat posed by Spain.
all, is exhortatory, and "the environmental apocalyptic leaves open
For all my exhortatory tone, I was not trying to lead anyone into the Promised Land except myself," she declares in the introduction to Against Interpretation.
Of course Luther's consistently exhortatory style in moral issues would be meaningless should there be no such thing as moral responsibility.
The changing relationships highlighted by these authors will inevitably be exacerbated in institutions such as universities where email is used to pass on regulatory and exhortatory messages.
While the conventional wisdom holds that the MRC has largely failed in its coordinating and governance roles, the authors argue that "if the softer notion of regulation as an exhortatory, goal setting, or framing use of knowledge is taken on board ...
This body of research serves an important exhortatory function, encouraging faculty members to serve as mentors.