exhumation


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ex·hume

 (ĭg-zo͞om′, -zyo͞om′, ĭk-syo͞om′, ĕks-hyo͞om′)
tr.v. ex·humed, ex·hum·ing, ex·humes
1. To remove from a grave; disinter.
2. To bring to light, especially after a period of obscurity.

[French exhumer, from Medieval Latin exhumāre : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin humus, ground; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′hu·ma′tion (ĕg′zyo͞o-mā′shən, ĕks′hyo͞o-) n.
ex·hum′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exhumation - the act of digging something out of the ground (especially a corpse) where it has been buriedexhumation - the act of digging something out of the ground (especially a corpse) where it has been buried
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إسْتِخْراج جُثَّه من قَبْر
opgravning
exhumálás
uppgröftur
ekshumacja
exhumácia
mezardan çıkarma

exhumation

[ˌekshjuːˈmeɪʃən] Nexhumación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

exhumation

[ˌɛgzjuːˈmeɪʃən] n [body] → exhumation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

exhumation

nExhumierung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

exhumation

[ˌɛkshjʊˈmeɪʃn] n (frm) → esumazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

exhume

(igˈzjuːm) verb
to dig out (especially a body from a grave).
exhumation (eksjuˈmeiʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

exhumation

n. exhumación, desenterramiento.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
This well-known precaution was adopted to prevent the speedy exhumation of the body by some of the carnivorous beasts of the prairie, whose instinct was sure to guide them to the spot.
Then the Home Office might have ordered exhumation. The whole thing would have come out, then, and he would have been in an awkward position, for no one would have believed that a man of his reputation could have been deceived into calling it heart disease."
Among the topics are pressure-temperature evolution and evidence for solution-mass-transfer deformation, brittle strain on the Coast Range fault zone, and the role of ductille thinning of the overburden to exhumation of the high-pressure metamorphic rocks.
THE exhumation of the grave of one of the bestknown English churchmen of the 19th Century has found that his body has disintegrated, the Catholic Church said.
Michelle Collins, 31, from Tylorstown, Rhondda, and her relatives, havedecided to pay pounds 1,200 for the exhumation of her grandfather John Alexander Morgan's coffin.
Greater Manchester Police ordered the exhumation after receiving information that a crime may have been committed.
Mrs Adams, from Newark, Nottinghamshire, and her husband David must raise the money for the exhumation, which will cost an estimated pounds 1,000.
Mrs Hodson, from Hunts Cross, asked for the exhumation of son Philip, whose retained organ has never been found, so she could re-bury him properly.
An exhumation is initiated when communities organize and petition for a site to be exhumed; this means survivors take the initiative in a process that returns agency to them as well as their memories.
Permission was given for the exhumation of three bodies from cemeteries in South West Durham, after an inquiry.
THE mother of Midland heroin addict Rachel Whitear has spoken of the 'terribly emotional' time leading up to the exhumation of her daughter's coffin.
The deep crustal rocks in the High Pressure belt evolved along very steep P-T-t paths, compatible with rapid exhumation by tectonic extrusion, whereas coeval high-T, medium-P rocks in the Low Pressure belt show evidence for more gradual exhumation (Indares et al., 2000; Rivers et al., 2002).