exigency


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ex·i·gen·cy

 (ĕk′sə-jən-sē, ĭg-zĭj′ən-)
n. pl. ex·i·gen·cies
1. A pressing or urgent situation: "We were caught in a wartime exigency that was beyond any humane, any rational, resistance" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
2. An urgent requirement; a pressing need: "distracted by the exigencies of running a business" (Richard Curtis).

exigency

(ˈɛksɪdʒənsɪ; ɪɡˈzɪdʒənsɪ) or

exigence

n, pl -gencies or -gences
1. the state of being exigent; urgency
2. (often plural) an urgent demand; pressing requirement
3. an emergency

ex•i•gen•cy

(ˈɛk sɪ dʒən si, ɪgˈzɪdʒ ən-)

n., pl. -cies.
1. exigent state or character; urgency.
2. Usu., exigencies. the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, condition, etc: the exigencies of city life.
3. a case or situation which demands prompt action or remedy; emergency or plight.
Often, ex′i•gence.
[1575–85; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exigency - a pressing or urgent situation; "the health-care exigency"
crisis - an unstable situation of extreme danger or difficulty; "they went bankrupt during the economic crisis"
2.exigency - a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate actionexigency - a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate action; "he never knew what to do in an emergency"
crisis - a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something; "after the crisis the patient either dies or gets better"

exigency

exigence
noun
1. need, demand, requirement, necessity, constraint, wont The reduction was caused by the exigencies of a wartime economy.

exigency

noun
1. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance:
2. A condition in which something necessary or desirable is required or wanted:
3. A decisive point:
4. Something asked for or needed.Often used in plural:
Translations

exigency

[ɪgˈzɪdʒənsɪ] N (= need) → exigencia f; (= emergency) → caso m de urgencia

exigency

[ˈɛksɪdʒənsi] nexigence f
the exigencies of sth → les exigences de qch

exigency

[ˈɛksɪdʒənsɪ] n (frm) → esigenza
References in classic literature ?
I had hired small lodgings, which I contrived to pay for out of a slender fund--the accumulated savings of my Eton pocket-money; for as it had ever been abhorrent to my nature to ask pecuniary assistance, I had early acquired habits of self-denying economy; husbanding my monthly allowance with anxious care, in order to obviate the danger of being forced, in some moment of future exigency, to beg additional aid.
In his dissenting opinion, Judge Sutton reasoned that officers could have just as likely been investigating a dangerous situation after an anonymous tip raised concerns, with no intent to create an exigency.
AAUP has asked Tulane to disclose information about its finances, since the university declared financial exigency that cleared the way for faculty dismissals in December.
In approaching the ideas of beginnings and endings from such a broad viewpoint, he deals with issues of attachment and avoidance, periods of "working-through" as "miniterminations," and the necessity of engaging in a phase of termination when patients end therapy whether through mutual consent of patient and analyst or because of external exigency.
In the present context, the political work of the late '60s through '70s--now purged of exigency and brought out of the closet by the market--may be evaluated differently.
In science and nature writing, context takes on various names, including landscape, scene, setting, rhetorical situation, place, space, the land, milieu, exigency, environment, ecology, among others.
If the author is sacrificed to language, it is argued, this is not to be conceived as the mere negation of authorial subjectivity; rather, the author, as a sacrificial figure, answers to the exigency of a figuration that would enable the a priori condition of signification in general to be exposed.
Not only does this make reading certain sections of the book a tedious process, but Hunt sometimes makes startling, overdrawn conclusions that seem unsupported by her evidence, (As an example, after a lengthy discussion about the practice of embryotomies, she writes "The exigency of detestable embryotomies, their loathsome aesthetics, the sacrificing of beautiful brown babies for the descendants of cannibals--such topoi were likely part of a missionary point of view at Yakusu" [p.
We will probably see a lot of public exigency and national emergency buys, rightfully or wrongfully.
Remembering our military past and the lives it cost is an exigency which demands immediate action.
It was also my task to handle, with not a little speed and exigency, the registration of foreign nationals wishing to fall within the employ of a Scottish club -despite what McCann says.
The Arab Revolt was not just the culmination of Arab nationalist activity or a rejection oft he ill-defined Ottomanist ideology, rather it was the convergence of dynastic ambition and strategic exigency that brought on the final break between Arab and Turk.