existentialism


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ex·is·ten·tial·ism

 (ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shə-lĭz′əm, ĕk′sĭ-)
n.
A philosophy that emphasizes the uniqueness and isolation of the individual experience in a hostile or indifferent universe, regards human existence as unexplainable, and stresses freedom of choice and responsibility for the consequences of one's acts.

ex′is·ten′tial·ist adj. & n.

existentialism

(ˌɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) a modern philosophical movement stressing the importance of personal experience and responsibility and the demands that they make on the individual, who is seen as a free agent in a deterministic and seemingly meaningless universe
ˌexisˈtentialist adj, n

ex•is•ten•tial•ism

(ˌɛg zɪˈstɛn ʃəˌlɪz əm, ˌɛk sɪ-)

n.
a philosophical movement, esp. of the 20th century, that stresses the individual's position as a self-determining agent responsible for his or her own choices.
[1940–45; < German Existentialismus (1919)]
ex`is•ten′tial•ist, adj., n.
ex`is•ten`tial•is′tic, adj.
ex`is•ten`tial•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

existentialism

1. the doctrine that man forms his essence in the course of the life resulting from his personal choices.
2. an emphasis upon man’s creating his own nature as well as the importance of personal freedom, decision, and commitment. Also called philosophical existentialism. Cf. essentialism.existentialist, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

existentialism

A practical philosophical tendency centered on the concrete realities of human life, rather than generalized abstractions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.existentialism - (philosophy) a 20th-century philosophical movement chiefly in Europe; assumes that people are entirely free and thus responsible for what they make of themselves
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
depersonalisation, depersonalization - (existentialism) a loss of personal identity; a feeling of being an anonymous cog in an impersonal social machine
Translations
وجودية
existencialismus
egzistencijalizam
実存主義
egzystencjalizm
existentialism

existentialism

[ˌegzɪsˈtenʃəlɪzəm] Nexistencialismo m

existentialism

[ˌɛgzɪˈstɛnʃəlɪzəm] nexistentialisme m

existentialism

existentialism

[ˌɛgzɪsˈtɛnʃəˌlɪzm] nesistenzialismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The world is constantly changing, speeding up even, and existentialism needs to keep up.
He single-handedly rehabilitated Nietzsche's reputation after World War II and was enormously influential in introducing postwar American readers to existentialism. Until now, no book has examined his intellectual legacy.
Among his topics are dignity, freedom, and reason: from ancient Greece to early modernity; Marx's critique of morality: natural law, the state, and citizenship; the human face of dignity reflected in phenomenology and existentialism; notes sampling research and practice: making dignity work, making dignity care; and the slighting of dignity: the critic's charter.
Having passion in philosophy, Mansour explained and clarified most of the philosophical movements and thoughts in his books about Existentialism, such as "El Wogodeyah" (Existentialism) and "El Wogood Wi El Aadam" (Existence and Nothingness).
This study will hopefully open new doors in the sphere of existentialism, as the paper explores a new outlook, a new dimension in the form of optimism, which has long been neglected or given very little attention.
In this thorough, conversational history, British biographer Sarah Bakewell strives to define (sort of) the philosophy of existentialism, give it context, describe its characters and their ideas, and explain why these ideas are important, both to the world and the author.
Working from his own translations of the original French texts, the author engages Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis.
The majority of educated people embrace mutually exclusive schools of thought: a vulgar sort of 19th-century determinism on one hand, and the existentialism of Camus and Sartre on the other.
Existentialism is said to have begun in 1932 when three young philosophers sat in the Bec-de-Gaz bar on the rue du Montparnasse in Paris, getting caught up on each other's lives and drinking the house specialty, apricot cocktails.
The philosopher who lies at the heart of this work is Jean-Paul Aymand Sartre, a key figure in the philosophy of existence (existentialism) and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in the 20th century philosophy.
Mailer and Nabokov drew extensively on these contemporary discourses of psychopathy, criminality, and existentialism. Mailer saw the psychopath's juvenile, pleasure-seeking narcissism as an opportunity for self-knowledge and rebirth.