existential

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ex·is·ten·tial

 (ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shəl, ĕk′sĭ-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence.
2. Based on experience; empirical.
3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice.
4. Linguistics Of or relating to a construction or part of a construction that indicates existence, as the words there is in the sentence There is a cat on the mat.
n. Linguistics
An existential word or construction.

ex′is·ten′tial·ly adv.

existential

(ˌɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəl)
adj
1. of or relating to existence, esp human existence
2. (Philosophy) philosophy pertaining to what exists, and is thus known by experience rather than reason; empirical as opposed to theoretical
3. (Logic) logic denoting or relating to a formula or proposition asserting the existence of at least one object fulfilling a given condition; containing an existential quantifier
4. (Philosophy) of or relating to existentialism
n
(Logic)
a. an existential statement or formula
ˌexisˈtentially adv

ex•is•ten•tial

(ˌɛg zɪˈstɛn ʃəl, ˌɛk sɪ-)

adj.
1. pertaining to existence.
2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of existentialism.
[1685–95; < Late Latin]
ex`is•ten′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.existential - derived from experience or the experience of existence; "the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers"- Benjamin Farrington; "formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters"- John Dewey
empirical, empiric - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
2.existential - of or as conceived by existentialism; "an existential moment of choice"
3.existential - relating to or dealing with existence (especially with human existence)
Translations

existential

[ˌegzɪsˈtenʃəl] ADJexistencial

existential

[ˌɛgzɪˈstɛnʃəl] adj
[question] → existentiel(le)
[fear, anxiety] → existentiel(le)

existential

existential

[ˌɛgzɪsˈtɛnʃl] adj (frm) → esistenziale
References in periodicals archive ?
With traditional oil and gas skills giving way rapidly to broader energy skills, equipping the workforce for this dynamic environment is existentially important.
Curiously, motherhood is rarely covered existentially and we are pleased to have a research paper from Claire Arnold-Baker that looks women's transitions into motherhood.
For each of his creations, the composer seeks to ask an existentially important question and answer it.
A call to her brother, whose continuous tragic absence has defined her existentially and artistically, but also a call to us all, the viewers of her work," comments director of NiMAC, where it will be staged, Dr Yiannis Toumazis.
"We are deeply concerned, economically, socially and politically, but almost existentially, about the absence of hard work to deal with the reality of the crisis and stop the bleeding.
This world may be minuscule and insignificant across the social spectrum but existentially it's meaningful for the individuals who inherit it.
Surprisingly, Hindman's bizarre, existentially traumatic stint as a pseudo-professional violinist hasn't spoiled classical music for her.
When living in a truly existentially crisis, both on a national and individual level, it is incumbent upon us all to first recognise that the status quo is unsustainable.
Such Unsung Heroes in our society are resolutely working across fields, in areas existentially critical for the society at large.
But these new "elites" think of themselves instead of institutions, worship diversity as a goal instead of individual excellence and tend to be people, as New York Times columnist David Brooks puts it, who have existentially lost "the self as the seat of the soul." Writing in The Washington Post of the man who had become a close friend, Bill Clinton commented that it would be "easy to sigh and say George H.W.
Drawing inspiration from the most existentially bored quarters of the sweater-set crowd, the short stories of Virginia Pye's Shelf Life of Happiness are unsettling, sighing laments.
That's because I carry all these existentially burdened character within me."