existential

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ex·is·ten·tial

 (ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shəl, ĕk′sĭ-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence.
2. Based on experience; empirical.
3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice.
4. Linguistics Of or relating to a construction or part of a construction that indicates existence, as the words there is in the sentence There is a cat on the mat.
n. Linguistics
An existential word or construction.

ex′is·ten′tial·ly adv.

existential

(ˌɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəl)
adj
1. of or relating to existence, esp human existence
2. (Philosophy) philosophy pertaining to what exists, and is thus known by experience rather than reason; empirical as opposed to theoretical
3. (Logic) logic denoting or relating to a formula or proposition asserting the existence of at least one object fulfilling a given condition; containing an existential quantifier
4. (Philosophy) of or relating to existentialism
n
(Logic)
a. an existential statement or formula
ˌexisˈtentially adv

ex•is•ten•tial

(ˌɛg zɪˈstɛn ʃəl, ˌɛk sɪ-)

adj.
1. pertaining to existence.
2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of existentialism.
[1685–95; < Late Latin]
ex`is•ten′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.existential - derived from experience or the experience of existence; "the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers"- Benjamin Farrington; "formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters"- John Dewey
empirical, empiric - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
2.existential - of or as conceived by existentialism; "an existential moment of choice"
3.existential - relating to or dealing with existence (especially with human existence)
Translations

existential

[ˌegzɪsˈtenʃəl] ADJexistencial

existential

[ˌɛgzɪˈstɛnʃəl] adj
[question] → existentiel(le)
[fear, anxiety] → existentiel(le)

existential

existential

[ˌɛgzɪsˈtɛnʃl] adj (frm) → esistenziale
References in periodicals archive ?
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- With about a month left to Turkey's existentially important early polls, the Justice and Development Party's (AKP) game plan seems to be intensifying on the Kurdish vote in the 15 provinces in the southeastern region, where a number of ballot boxes are declared to be removed from many districts due to the violent conflict spreading across the settlements and escalating into a serious crisis.
Even if your "why" isn't bold or existentially fulfilling, even if it's just that you need to get the bills paid this month, that's enough of a "why" to motivate you.
Neither will all evangelicals who find historically evolved liturgies stultifying and existentially aloof heed R.
This agreement will existentially endanger not only Israel but Europe and the United States.
Ben's strengths-based and action-oriented approach to helping adolescents, adults, and senior adults is centered on a culturally competent, trauma-informed, and existentially oriented approach to counseling and psychotherapy.
Rai's foolishness aside, thanks to Assad Syria's minorities, Christian or Muslim, have never been so existentially threatened.
The problem was existentially solved in the 20th century when secularism hit with such a wallop that most people had trouble believing in the afterlife at all, let alone in an unhinged deity separating the sheep from the goats for no fair-seeming reason.
Though requiring book length explanation, the meaning is a far more existentially peaceful one that does not contradict freedom of speech.
General Peter Pace, former US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said we may see the threat (of terrorism) differently, but we are existentially threatened.
You don't know what to expect because it's just completely, existentially out of anything that you've ever experienced before and it's quite indescribable.
Like the work's title, these are fragmentary quotes from the Talking Heads song "Once in a Lifetime": existentially troubling inquiries about the relation of inner consciousness to the outer structures of everyday modern life.
Archibald Snatcher (a deliciously snarling Ben Kingsley), having promised to rid the town of the Boxtrolls, hunts them with his existentially confused henchmen (Richard Ayoade, Nick Frost), who -- in the movie's cleverest bit -- are in a quandary over whether they've unwittingly become bad guys.