exoenzyme


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Related to exoenzyme: extracellular enzyme

ex·o·en·zyme

 (ĕk′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An enzyme, such as a digestive enzyme, that functions outside the cell from which it originates.

exoenzyme

(ˌɛksəʊˈɛnzaɪm)
n
1. (Biochemistry) any enzyme, esp an exopeptidase, that acts upon terminal chemical bonds in a chain of molecules. Compare endoenzyme
2. (Biochemistry) another name for ectoenzyme
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References in periodicals archive ?
autoinducer regulates the production of exoenzyme virulence determinants
Of particular note among these genes is the increased expression of ENPP, an exoenzyme known to enhance experimental metastasis and angiogenesis, and the down-regulation of many genes (EMP2, DCN, FMOD, LUM, COL1A1) involved in cell-to-cell interaction and the assembly of extracellular matrix.
TXT, line 294833, also allegedly Stedman One square plus five variations, and one square akin to FEASTINGS above: GLEMARECI Pseudolaophonte glemareci paraminuta, ITISa LAMINARAN OED EMANATIST Emantist, OED MINIROSEA Ocenebra minirosea atlantica, ITISa ANARCOTIN Web2 RATOONING OED ratoon ERISTICAL OED CASEINASE an exoenzyme, common on Web; or CASEINATE Web2 INTANGLED or INTANGLES or INTANGLER, OED entangle, verb IEASTINGS Shakes.
EPA bioaccumulation test method and other standard sediment bioassays such as the amphipod lethality, sea urchin fertilization, Microtox solid-phase and bacterial exoenzyme tests, which are currently recommended by Environment Canada for sediment assessment.
ADP-Ribosylation and Subcellular Redistribution of Rac1 by Exoenzyme S.
aeruginosa infections are caused by two virulent protein toxins secreted by the bacterium, Exotoxin A and Exoenzyme S.
Schimel JP, Weintraub MN (2003) The implications of exoenzyme activity on microbial carbon and nitrogen limitation in soil: a theoretical model.
albicans many virulence factors, such as germ tube formation, exoenzyme production, and phenotypic switching (10).