exogenous

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ex·og·e·nous

 (ĕk-sŏj′ə-nəs)
adj.
1. Originating externally: an exogenous model of economic growth.
2. Originating or produced from outside a cell, tissue, or organism: exogenous antioxidants.

[French exogène : Greek exō-, exo- + French -gène, -gen.]

ex·og′e·nous·ly adv.
ex·og′e·ny (-ə-mē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exogenous

(ɛkˈsɒdʒɪnəs)
adj
1. having an external origin
2. (Biology) biology
a. developing or originating outside an organism or part of an organism
b. of or relating to external factors, such as light, that influence an organism
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry (of a mental illness) caused by external factors
exˈogenously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•og•e•nous

(ɛkˈsɒdʒ ə nəs)

adj.
originating from outside; derived externally.
[1820–30]
ex•og′e•nism, n.
ex•og′e•nous•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exogenous - derived or originating externally
endogenic, endogenous - derived or originating internally
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ex·og·e·nous

a. exógeno-a, externo-a, que se origina fuera del organismo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Those related to contagion arising from financial interdependence (an exogenous factor).
Shorting it against a European currency is attractive because it's close to a pure-play on the euro's weakness and less likely to be derailed by an exogenous factor.
Utilizing a political economy approach, the volume argues that the neoclassical economics framework that serves as the basis of much donor funding fails to take into account the conflict realities of Israeli occupation, treating them instead as a temporary, exogenous factor and further argues that the political, strategic, and ideological interests of the donor are often the cause of the unwillingness of the donors to take into account these conflict realities and how they interact with the economy.
An exogenous factor affects a market from the outside and is largely beyond the influence of entrepreneurs or resource providers.
A political economy approach also challenges the neo-classical treatment of technological change as an exogenous factor. Endogenous growth theory, for example, understands technological change as integrally related to investment, the organization of production, industrial relations and labour productivity.
"This is an exogenous factor we're going to have to simply deal with."
Williams and Liebhold state that weather is the most likely exogenous factor affecting field populations, but then concede that annual weather patterns show little (if any) autocorrelation.
I think an exogenous factor must be involved," he said.
The key impediment for this development appears at the moment to be an exogenous factor. Namely, the US policy in the Middle East and its demands from Turkey, which forces the latter into a currently impossible position of attempting to balance its own national interest and those of its biggest and closest ally.
Berryman and Turchin (1997) argue that our earlier report (Williams and Liebhold 1995) on the ambiguity of tests for delayed density dependence suggested by Turchin (1990) was "pessimistic." This argument is based on several assertions: (1) our values of r, the intrinsic rate of increase, and [Psi], the autocorrelation in the exogenous factor, were unrealistic; (2) the lengths of our simulated time series (50 yr) inflated the detection of second-order effects; (3) we failed to provide any realistic examples of exogenous variables that could cause spurious results; and (4) in all of the systems where these tests have indicated delayed density dependence, other sources of evidence have supported this conclusion.
Equilibrium in the market is defined by a zero profit condition.(1) The generality of the model is provided by an assumed exogenous factor, "the toughness of price competition," which defines the assumptions under which the post entry price (quantity) determination game is played.(2) The model is also generalized from cases of homogeneous products to differentiated products where advertising decisions become a part of the model and the "effectiveness of advertising" becomes a second exogenous factor.