exonerate

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ex·on·er·ate

 (ĭg-zŏn′ə-rāt′)
tr.v. ex·on·er·at·ed, ex·on·er·at·ing, ex·on·er·ates
1. To free from blame.
2. To free from a responsibility, obligation, or task.

[Middle English exoneraten, from Latin exonerāre, exonerāt-, to free from a burden : ex-, ex- + onus, oner-, burden.]

ex·on′er·a′tion n.
ex·on′er·a′tive adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exonerate

(ɪɡˈzɒnəˌreɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to clear or absolve from blame or a criminal charge
2. to relieve from an obligation or task; exempt
[C16: from Latin exonerāre to free from a burden, from onus a burden]
exˌonerˈation n
exˈonerative adj
exˈonerˌator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•on•er•ate

(ɪgˈzɒn əˌreɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to clear from accusation, guilt, or blame.
2. to relieve from an obligation, duty, or task.
[1515–25; late Middle English < Latin exonerātus, past participle of exonerāre to unburden, discharge =ex- ex-1 + onerāre to load]
ex•on`er•a′tion, n.
ex•on′er•a`tive, adj.
ex•on′er•a`tor, n.
syn: See absolve.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

exonerate


Past participle: exonerated
Gerund: exonerating

Imperative
exonerate
exonerate
Present
I exonerate
you exonerate
he/she/it exonerates
we exonerate
you exonerate
they exonerate
Preterite
I exonerated
you exonerated
he/she/it exonerated
we exonerated
you exonerated
they exonerated
Present Continuous
I am exonerating
you are exonerating
he/she/it is exonerating
we are exonerating
you are exonerating
they are exonerating
Present Perfect
I have exonerated
you have exonerated
he/she/it has exonerated
we have exonerated
you have exonerated
they have exonerated
Past Continuous
I was exonerating
you were exonerating
he/she/it was exonerating
we were exonerating
you were exonerating
they were exonerating
Past Perfect
I had exonerated
you had exonerated
he/she/it had exonerated
we had exonerated
you had exonerated
they had exonerated
Future
I will exonerate
you will exonerate
he/she/it will exonerate
we will exonerate
you will exonerate
they will exonerate
Future Perfect
I will have exonerated
you will have exonerated
he/she/it will have exonerated
we will have exonerated
you will have exonerated
they will have exonerated
Future Continuous
I will be exonerating
you will be exonerating
he/she/it will be exonerating
we will be exonerating
you will be exonerating
they will be exonerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been exonerating
you have been exonerating
he/she/it has been exonerating
we have been exonerating
you have been exonerating
they have been exonerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been exonerating
you will have been exonerating
he/she/it will have been exonerating
we will have been exonerating
you will have been exonerating
they will have been exonerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been exonerating
you had been exonerating
he/she/it had been exonerating
we had been exonerating
you had been exonerating
they had been exonerating
Conditional
I would exonerate
you would exonerate
he/she/it would exonerate
we would exonerate
you would exonerate
they would exonerate
Past Conditional
I would have exonerated
you would have exonerated
he/she/it would have exonerated
we would have exonerated
you would have exonerated
they would have exonerated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

exonerate

To free a person of any blame.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.exonerate - pronounce not guilty of criminal chargesexonerate - pronounce not guilty of criminal charges; "The suspect was cleared of the murder charges"
vindicate - clear of accusation, blame, suspicion, or doubt with supporting proof; "You must vindicate yourself and fight this libel"
whitewash - exonerate by means of a perfunctory investigation or through biased presentation of data
purge - clear of a charge
pronounce, label, judge - pronounce judgment on; "They labeled him unfit to work here"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

exonerate

verb acquit, clear, excuse, pardon, justify, discharge, vindicate, absolve, exculpate The official report exonerated the school of any blame.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

exonerate

verb
To free from a charge or imputation of guilt:
Law: acquit, purge.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

exonerate

[ɪgˈzɒnəreɪt] VT to exonerate sb (from) [+ obligations, blame] → exonerar a algn (de)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

exonerate

[ɪgˈzɒnəreɪt] vtdisculper
to exonerate sb from sth → disculper qn de qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

exonerate

vtentlasten (from von)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

exonerate

[ɪgˈzɒnəˌreɪt] vt (frm) to exonerate sb (from sth)discolpare qn (da qc)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
To all this Clennam merely replied that, granting the whole protest, nothing in it lessened the force, or could lessen the force, of the voluntary and public exoneration of his partner.
The bill also swaps out terms like "in prison" and "imprisonment" for terms like "incarceration" throughout the statute, to make clear that exonerations can be secured for overturned jail sentences as well as prison convictions.
To date, in the National Registry of Exonerations, there have been over thirty cases where an innocent agreed to a plea bargain in a child sex abuse case.
Institutional discrimination, unconscious bias and explicit racism against African Americans were factors in some of the wrongful convictions, according to the study released in March 2017 from the National Registry of Exonerations, World News reported.
The exonerations were the result of a collaborative investigation by the Manhattan district attorney's Conviction Integrity Program and the Innocence Project, which had DNA evidence retested.
For years, Harris County was a big reason for the nation's climbing number of criminal exonerations, due to a backlog of drug cases in which testing showed defendants were actually innocent.
Reacting to the CA's ruling in favor of Reyes, De Lima said the public 'that is already disgusted with the plethora of acquittals and pre-trial exonerations performed by the judiciary (sees this as) judicial impunity at its worst in the history of the country.'
The Innocence Project is an academic legal clinic in which law students and faculty review claims of innocence submitted by convicted prisoners, then seek exonerations in those cases that warrant it.
DNA testing and evidence has been used in criminal exonerations since 1989.
According to the National Registry of Exonerations, since 1989 there have been more than 2,000 individuals exonerated through late-coming evidence, such as DNA tests, recanted testimony, and admissions of guilt by others.
The (http://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Pages/about.aspx) National Registry of Exonerations , a joint project run between the University of Michigan, Michigan State and University of California, Irvine, examined the cases of 1,900 people in the U.S.