exophthalmic


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ex·oph·thal·mic

 (ĕk′səf-thăl′mĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to exophthalmos.
2. Characterized by the prominence of the eyeballs.
Translations

ex·oph·thal·mic

a. exoftálmico-a, rel. a la exoftalmia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kocher encountered the striking malady of exophthalmic goiter, as describe by Grave's [2] preoperatively.
Romanelli, "Dry eye syndrome in non exophthalmic Graves' disease," Seminas in Ophthalmology, vol.
This condition was called Marine-Lenhart to honor the work done by David Marine and Carl H Lenhart at the beginning of the century when they published a study entitled "the pathological anatomy of exophthalmic goiter" [4].
One of the earliest reports of thyroid cancer in exophthalmic goitre was recorded in 1948 by Pemberton and Black [1].
Radiographs showed the OS was moderately exophthalmic with no osteolysis (Fig 1).
Hypernephroma of Thyroid, with Clinical Picture of Exophthalmic Goiter by Anatole Kolodny, PhD, MD, Iowa City
If ptosis, proptosis, and chemosis are also additionally found, it is severe exophthalmic ocular myositis (SEOM) (6).
That revision opened the door to highbrow appreciation of Picasso's resort to crude stylizations evoking the "primitive." The impetuous Spaniard would surely have found more inspiration in that expressionistic, exophthalmic male portrait bust from late antiquity than in a far more skillful portrait by a Hellenistic master, or by a modern master like Houdon.
Constantin Brancusi's exophthalmic Mademoiselle Pogany, 1912, and Joseph Bernard's genteel Young Girl with a Jug, 1912, contrast with the Germanic medieval izing of Wilhelm Lehmbruck's Kneeling Woman, 1911, not to mention a famed bas-relief of a frame-enclosed nude by Aristide Maillol.
Therefore, history of surgery should also be questioned in patients presenting with a decreased vision, red and exophthalmic eye with ophthalmoplegia.
Because of his wide interests and reading he was as comfortable writing about Samuel Johnson, Charles Dickens, Socrates or the sculpture of Jacob Epstein as on exophthalmic ophthalmoplegia carpal tunnel syndrome, cervical spondylosis, the non-metastatic manifestations of malignancy, speech disorders and mind-body problems, to which he made notable contributions.
The most remarkable physical findings were a regular pulse of 120 beats per minute, palpable diffuse goiter with palpable right thyroid nodule, exophthalmic measurement OD of 18 and OS of 20, lid lag and hypereflexia.