exorbitant


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ex·or·bi·tant

 (ĭg-zôr′bĭ-tənt)
adj.
Going beyond what is reasonable or customary, especially in cost or price: exorbitant rent; exorbitant telephone bills.

[Middle English, aberrant, flagrant, from Old French, excessive, extreme, from Late Latin exorbitāns, exorbitant-, present participle of exorbitāre, to deviate : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin orbita, path, track; see orbit.]

ex·or′bi·tant·ly adv.

exorbitant

(ɪɡˈzɔːbɪtənt)
adj
(of prices, demands, etc) in excess of what is reasonable; excessive; extravagant; immoderate
[C15: from Late Latin exorbitāre to deviate, from Latin orbita track]
exˈorbitance, exˈorbitancy n
exˈorbitantly adv

ex•or•bi•tant

(ɪgˈzɔr bɪ tənt)

adj.
exceeding the bounds of custom, propriety, or reason, esp. in amount or extent: exorbitant prices; exorbitant luxury.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin exorbitant-, s. of exorbitāns, present participle of exorbitāre to deviate from the track]
ex•or′bi•tant•ly, adv.

exorbitant

- Originally a legal term for a case outside of the scope of a law; since it implies going "out of orbit," it also first meant "deviating from the true path."
See also related terms for orbit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exorbitant - greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "exorbitant rent"; "extortionate prices"; "spends an outrageous amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "unconscionable spending"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

exorbitant

exorbitant

adjective
Exceeding a normal or reasonable limit:
Translations
مُفْرِط، باهِظ
umådeholdenurimelig
óhóflegur
be saikobesaikisperdėtai
pārmērīgs
aşırı yüksek

exorbitant

[ɪgˈzɔːbɪtənt] ADJ [rent, price, fee] → exorbitante, abusivo; [demands] → desorbitado, desmesurado

exorbitant

[ɪgˈzɔːrbɪtənt] adj
[price, fee, rent] → exorbitant(e), excessif/ive
[demands] → exorbitant(e), démesuré(e)

exorbitant

adjüberhöht; price alsounverschämt; demandmaßlos, übertrieben; that’s exorbitant!das ist Wucher!

exorbitant

[ɪgˈzɔːbɪtnt] adj (price) → esorbitante; (demands) → spropositato/a

exorbitant

(igˈzoːbitənt) adjective
(of prices or demands) very high or unreasonable.
exˈorbitantly adverb
exˈorbitance noun
References in classic literature ?
(heaven knows it is not exorbitant in its requirements!); for although I well know how hard it is for a man of genius with a seriously underrated subject to maintain serene and kindly relations with the men who underrate it, and who keep all the best places for less important subjects which they profess without originality and sometimes without much capacity for them, still, if he overwhelms them with wrath and disdain, he cannot expect them to heap honors on him.
Mynheer Boxtel went to the headsman, to whom he gave himself out as a great friend of the condemned man; and from whom he bought all the clothes of the dead man that was to be, for one hundred guilders; rather an exorbitant sum, as he engaged to leave all the trinkets of gold and silver to the executioner.
I was far from expecting ever to belong to him, for the price asked for me from the time I was first enslaved was exorbitant, and always provoked either anger or derision, yet my master stuck stubbornly to it -- twenty-two dollars.
Shimerda: he was unable to meet a note which fell due on the first of November; had to pay an exorbitant bonus on renewing it, and to give a mortgage on his pigs and horses and even his milk cow.
Exorbitant duties on imported articles would beget a general spirit of smuggling; which is always prejudicial to the fair trader, and eventually to the revenue itself: they tend to render other classes of the community tributary, in an improper degree, to the manufacturing classes, to whom they give a premature monopoly of the markets; they sometimes force industry out of its more natural channels into others in which it flows with less advantage; and in the last place, they oppress the merchant, who is often obliged to pay them himself without any retribution from the consumer.
In a recent work, we have had to speak of this tribe of Indians from the experience of other traders who had casually been among them, and who represented them as selfish, inhospitable, exorbitant in their dealings, and much addicted to thieving; Captain Bonneville, on the contrary, who resided much among them, and had repeated opportunities of ascertaining their real character, invariably speaks of them as kind and hospitable, scrupulously honest, and remarkable, above all other Indians that he had met with, for a strong feeling of religion.
Men like Crimsworth, if firmly and calmly resisted, always abate something of their exorbitant insolence; he had no mind to be brought before a magistrate, and I suppose he saw I meant what I said.
Knavery and folly, though never so exorbitant, will more easily meet with assent; for ill-nature adds great support and strength to faith.
Fortunately for those who pay their court through such foibles, a fond mother, though, in pursuit of praise for her children, the most rapacious of human beings, is likewise the most credulous; her demands are exorbitant; but she will swallow any thing; and the excessive affection and endurance of the Miss Steeles towards her offspring were viewed therefore by Lady Middleton without the smallest surprise or distrust.
The nobles, whose power had become exorbitant during the reign of Stephen, and whom the prudence of Henry the Second had scarce reduced to some degree of subjection to the crown, had now resumed their ancient license in its utmost extent; despising the feeble interference of the English Council of State, fortifying their castles, increasing the number of their dependants, reducing all around them to a state of vassalage, and striving by every means in their power, to place themselves each at the head of such forces as might enable him to make a figure in the national convulsions which appeared to be impending.
He established a fixed rate for servants' wages, which were becoming recklessly exorbitant. He laid extremely heavy penalties upon those who sang lewd or loose songs either by day or night.
There was food aboard, albeit at exorbitant prices, and the three of them contrived to eat a meal on one of the seats forward.