exordium


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ex·or·di·um

 (ĭg-zôr′dē-əm, ĭk-sôr′-)
n. pl. ex·or·di·ums or ex·or·di·a (-dē-ə)
A beginning or introductory part, especially of a speech or treatise.

[Latin, from exōrdīrī, to begin : ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + ōrdīrī, to begin; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·or′di·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exordium

(ɛkˈsɔːdɪəm)
n, pl -diums or -dia (-dɪə)
(Rhetoric) an introductory part or beginning, esp of an oration or discourse
[C16: from Latin, from exōrdīrī to begin, from ōrdīrī to begin]
exˈordial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•or•di•um

(ɪgˈzɔr di əm, ɪkˈsɔr-)

n., pl. -di•ums, -di•a (-di ə)
an introductory part, as of an oration or treatise.
[1525–35; < Latin exōrdium <exōrd(īrī) to begin]
ex•or′di•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

exordium

the beginning or introductory part of a book or other printed work, or of a discourse.
See also: Books, Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exordium - (rhetoric) the introductory section of an oration or discourse
rhetoric - study of the technique and rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking)
introduction - the first section of a communication
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Similarly, in the case of speeches, the exordium is prior in order to the narrative.
It will readily be surmised from this exordium that--incredible as it may seem in a man of thirty--this was my first visit to Paris.
'Mr Varden,' returned the other, perfectly composed under this exordium; 'I beg you'll take a chair.
I trembled violently at his exordium, and my father continued-- "I confess, my son, that I have always looked forward to your marriage with our dear Elizabeth as the tie of our domestic comfort and the stay of my declining years.
There was something charmingly cordial and engaging in the manner in which after saying "Now, Handel," as if it were the grave beginning of a portentous business exordium, he had suddenly given up that tone, stretched out his honest hand, and spoken like a schoolboy.
He complicated this exordium by an exposition in which he painted the power and the deeds of the cardinal, that incomparable minister, that conqueror of past minister, that conqueror of past ministers, that example for ministers to come--deeds and power which none could thwart with impunity.
"Sire," said Villefort, "I will render a faithful report to your majesty, but I must entreat your forgiveness if my anxiety leads to some obscurity in my language." A glance at the king after this discreet and subtle exordium, assured Villefort of the benignity of his august auditor, and he went on: --
Nothing was heard but the deep though affectionate tones of the reader, as he went slowly through this exordium; until, something unfortunately striking the mind of Richard as incomplete, he left his place and walked on tiptoe from the room.
Stubb's exordium to his crew is given here at large, because he had rather a peculiar way of talking to them in general, and especially in inculcating the religion of rowing.
This exordium, and Miss Pross's two hands in quite agonised entreaty clasping his, decided Mr.
This was a formidable exordium. Jehan braced himself for a rough encounter.
Brooke heard the laughter; but he had expected some Tory efforts at disturbance, and he was at this moment additionally excited by the tickling, stinging sense that his lost exordium was coming back to fetch him from the Baltic.