expecting


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ex·pect

 (ĭk-spĕkt′)
v. ex·pect·ed, ex·pect·ing, ex·pects
v.tr.
1.
a. To look forward to the probable occurrence or appearance of: expecting a phone call; expects rain on Sunday.
b. To consider likely or certain: expect to see them soon. See Usage Note at anticipate.
2. To consider reasonable or due: We expect an apology.
3. To consider obligatory; require: The school expects its pupils to be on time.
4. Informal To presume; suppose.
v.intr.
To be pregnant. Used in progressive tenses: My wife is expecting again.

[Latin exspectāre : ex-, ex- + spectāre, to look at, frequentative of specere, to see; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·pect′a·ble adj.
ex·pect′a·bly adv.
ex·pect′ed·ly adv.
ex·pect′ed·ness n.
Synonyms: expect, anticipate, hope, await
These verbs relate to the idea of looking ahead to something in the future. To expect is to look forward to the likely occurrence or appearance of someone or something: "We should not expect something for nothing—but we all do and call it Hope" (Edgar W. Howe).
Anticipate sometimes refers to taking advance action, as to forestall or prevent the occurrence of something expected or to meet a wish or request before it is articulated: anticipated the storm and locked the shutters. The term can also refer to having a foretaste of something expected: The police are anticipating trouble with rowdy fans after the game. To hope is to look forward with desire and usually with a measure of confidence in the likelihood of gaining what is desired: I hope to see you soon. To await is to wait expectantly and with certainty: She is eagerly awaiting your letter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expecting

(ɪkˈspɛktɪŋ)
adj
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) informal pregnant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

expecting

adjective pregnant, with child, expectant, in the club (Brit. slang), in the family way (informal), gravid, enceinte He had just heard that Beverly was expecting again.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

expecting

adjective
Carrying a developing fetus within the uterus:
Slang: gone.
Archaic: great.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

expecting

n. anticipación, esperanza, anhelo;
___ mothermujer embarazada.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

expecting

adj (obst, fam) embarazada, esperando bebé
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"No, Leslie is expecting him and has his supper ready.
The countess, who had long noticed what was going on between them and was expecting this declaration, listened to him in silence and then told her son that he might marry whom he pleased, but that neither she nor his father would give their blessing to such a marriage.
Every time there was heard the creak of the opened door the conversation in the crowd died away, and everybody looked round expecting to see the bride and bridegroom come in.
The priest was continually sending first the beadle and then the deacon to find out whether the bridegroom had not come, more and more often he went himself, in a lilac vestment and an embroidered sash, to the side door, expecting to see the bridegroom.
It was possible, however, that some of his companions in the shire might be able to give more information; and though she was not very sanguine in expecting it, the application was a something to look forward to.
When her master was departed, Mrs Deborah stood silent, expecting her cue from Miss Bridget; for as to what had past before her master, the prudent housekeeper by no means relied upon it, as she had often known the sentiments of the lady in her brother's absence to differ greatly from those which she had expressed in his presence.
Because men, when they receive good from him of whom they were expecting evil, are bound more closely to their benefactor; thus the people quickly become more devoted to him than if he had been raised to the principality by their favours; and the prince can win their affections in many ways, but as these vary according to the circumstances one cannot give fixed rules, so I omit them; but, I repeat, it is necessary for a prince to have the people friendly, otherwise he has no security in adversity.