expedient


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ex·pe·di·ent

 (ĭk-spē′dē-ənt)
adj.
1. Suitable or efficient for accomplishing a purpose: thought email was the most expedient way to communicate with distant relatives.
2. Convenient but based on a concern for self-interest rather than principle: changed his position when it was politically expedient.
3. Obsolete Speedy; expeditious.
n.
1. Something that is a means to an end, especially when based on self-interest: compromised only as an expedient to boost his career.
2. Something contrived or used to meet an urgent need: exhausted every expedient before filing a lawsuit.

[Middle English, from Latin expediēns, expedient-, present participle of expedīre, to make ready; see expedite.]

ex·pe′di·ent·ly adv.

expedient

(ɪkˈspiːdɪənt)
adj
1. suitable to the circumstances; appropriate
2. inclined towards methods or means that are advantageous rather than fair or just
n
something suitable or appropriate, esp something used during an urgent situation
[C14: from Latin expediēns setting free; see expedite]
exˈpediently adv

ex•pe•di•ent

(ɪkˈspi di ənt)

adj.
1. fit or suitable for the purpose; proper; advisable: It is expedient that you go.
2. conducive to advantage; governed by self-interest; advantageous.
n.
3. a handy means to an end.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin expedient-, s. of expediēns, present participle of expedīre. See expedite, -ent]
ex•pe′di•ent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expedient - a means to an end; not necessarily a principled or ethical one
means, way, agency - how a result is obtained or an end is achieved; "a means of control"; "an example is the best agency of instruction"; "the true way to success"
make-do, makeshift, stopgap - something contrived to meet an urgent need or emergency
crutch - anything that serves as an expedient; "he uses drugs as a psychological crutch"
temporary expedient, improvisation - an unplanned expedient
last resort, pis aller - an expedient adopted only in desperation; "`pis aller' is French for `worst going'"
Adj.1.expedient - serving to promote your interest; "was merciful only when mercy was expedient"
advantageous - giving an advantage; "a contract advantageous to our country"; "socially advantageous to entertain often"
convenient - suited to your comfort or purpose or needs; "a convenient excuse for not going"
politic - marked by artful prudence, expedience, and shrewdness; "it is neither polite nor politic to get into other people's quarrels"; "a politic decision"; "a politic manager"; "a politic old scoundrel"; "a shrewd and politic reply"
useful, utile - being of use or service; "the girl felt motherly and useful"; "a useful job"; "a useful member of society"
inexpedient - not suitable or advisable; "an inexpedient tactic"
2.expedient - appropriate to a purpose; practical; "in the circumstances it was expedient to express loyalty"
politic - marked by artful prudence, expedience, and shrewdness; "it is neither polite nor politic to get into other people's quarrels"; "a politic decision"; "a politic manager"; "a politic old scoundrel"; "a shrewd and politic reply"

expedient

noun
1. means, measure, scheme, method, resource, resort, device, manoeuvre, expediency, stratagem, contrivance, stopgap I reduced my spending by the simple expedient of destroying my credit cards.

expedient

adjective
1. Suited to one's end or purpose:
2. Worth doing, especially for practical reasons:
noun
Something used temporarily or reluctantly when other means are not available:
Translations
مُلائِم، مُناسِب
hensigtsmæssigsmart
ajánlatos
hentugur; ráîlegur
tikslingas
ieteicamslietderīgsnoderīgs
işine gelen

expedient

[ɪksˈpiːdɪənt]
A. ADJ (= convenient, politic) → oportuno, conveniente
B. Nrecurso m

expedient

[ɪkˈspiːdiənt]
adjopportun(e)
nexpédient m

expedient

adj (= politic)zweckdienlich; (= advisable)angebracht, ratsam
nNotbehelf m, → Hilfsmittel nt

expedient

[ɪksˈpiːdɪənt]
1. nespediente m
2. adj (convenient, politic) → conveniente, opportuno/a

expedient

(ikˈspiːdiənt) adjective
convenient or advisable. It is not expedient to pay him what he has asked.
exˈpedience noun
exˈpediency noun
References in classic literature ?
The place is, indeed, invested," returned Duncan; "but is there no expedient by which we may enter?
Not improbably he was the best workman of his time; or, perhaps, the Colonel thought it expedient, or was impelled by some better feeling, thus openly to cast aside all animosity against the race of his fallen antagonist.
That he never read the Bible; never went to church; that he jested and made free with any and every thing that came in the way of his wit; that he spent his Sunday evenings at the opera or theatre; that he went to wine parties, and clubs, and suppers, oftener than was at all expedient,--were all things that Tom could see as plainly as anybody, and on which he based a conviction that "Mas'r wasn't a Christian;"--a conviction, however, which he would have been very slow to express to any one else, but on which he founded many prayers, in his own simple fashion, when he was by himself in his little dormitory.
For government is an expedient, by which men would fain succeed in letting one another alone; and, as has been said, when it is most expedient, the governed are most let alone by it.
I was from Con- necticut, whose Constitution declares "that all political power is inherent in the people, and all free govern- ments are founded on their authority and instituted for their benefit; and that they have AT ALL TIMES an undeni- able and indefeasible right to ALTER THEIR FORM OF GOVERN- MENT in such a manner as they may think expedient.
He was asked by Colonel Lloyd and my old master, why he resorted to this extraordinary expedient.
Elton's voice from the sittingroom had not checked her, and made it expedient to compress all her friendly and all her congratulatory sensations into a very, very earnest shake of the hand.
Smith-- and if that is the case, it must be highly expedient for Willoughby to be but little in Devonshire at present.
said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if that could not be effected, never eating or drinking more, and letting myself die.
But I could not help observing that he seemed to think he had hit upon a wonderful expedient for expressing himself in a neat, agreeable, and pointed manner, without the inconvenience of inventing conversation.
Instead I desperately resorted to the time-honoured expedient of setting up a stick and going in the direction of its fall.
The reader has here the original legend from which the incident in the romance is derived; and the identifying the irregular Eremite with the Friar Tuck of Robin Hood's story, was an obvious expedient.