expellable


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ex·pel

 (ĭk-spĕl′)
tr.v. ex·pelled, ex·pel·ling, ex·pels
1. To force or drive out: expel an invader.
2. To discharge from or as if from a receptacle: expelled a sigh of relief.
3. To deprive of membership or rights in an organization; force to leave: expelled the student from college for cheating.

[Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere : ex-, ex- + pellere, to drive; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·pel′la·ble adj.
ex·pel′ler n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
So on this, the first Lady-Day on which the Durbeyfields were expellable, the house, being roomy, was required for a carter with a large family; and Widow Joan, her daughters Tess and
"Do we get to the point where somebody's personal feelings on race are an expellable offense?
However, in our study, smooth hammerhead preyed upon pelagic fishes with small and expellable otoliths, often preventing species identification (Lombarte et al., 2010).