experimenter


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Related to experimenter: experimenter bias, experimenter effect

ex·per·i·ment

 (ĭk-spĕr′ə-mənt)
n.
1.
a. A test under controlled conditions that is made to demonstrate a known truth, examine the validity of a hypothesis, or determine the efficacy of something previously untried.
b. The process of conducting such a test; experimentation.
2. An innovative act or procedure: "Democracy is only an experiment in government" (William Ralph Inge).
3. The result of experimentation: "We are not [nature's] only experiment" (R. Buckminster Fuller).
intr.v. (-mĕnt′) ex·per·i·ment·ed, ex·per·i·ment·ing, ex·per·i·ments
1. To conduct an experiment.
2. To try something new, especially in order to gain experience: experiment with new methods of teaching.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin experīmentum, from experīrī, to try; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·per′i·ment′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.experimenter - a research worker who conducts experiments
investigator, research worker, researcher - a scientist who devotes himself to doing research
2.experimenter - a person who enjoys testing innovative ideas; "she was an experimenter in new forms of poetry"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
tinker, tinkerer - a person who enjoys fixing and experimenting with machines and their parts
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
experimentátor

experimenter

[ɪksˈperɪmentəʳ] Ninvestigador(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

experimenter

[ɪkˈspɛrɪmentər] nexpérimentateur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

experimenter

[ɪkˈspɛrɪməntəʳ] nsperimentatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
She was an inveterate experimenter in these things.
A curious, an erudite artist, certainly, he is to some extent an experimenter in rhyme or metre, often hazardous.
It made short work of the experimenter -- and of his family, too, if he mur- dered somebody who belonged up among the orna- mental ranks.
But lest I should mislead any when I have my own head and obey my whims, let me remind the reader that I am only an experimenter. Do not set the least value on what I do, or the least discredit on what I do not, as if I pretended to settle any thing as true or false.
"These experiments," he says, "are not experiments at all in the sense of a scientific methodology; they are counterfeit experiments, that seem methodical simply because they are ordinarily performed in a psychological laboratory, and involve the co-operation of two persons, who purport to be experimenter and observer.
Suppress for a few days your criticism on the insufficiency of this or that teacher or experimenter, and he will have demonstrated his insufficiency to all men's eyes.
The ultra-violet rays, and other high-velocity and invisible rays from the upper end of the spectrum, rip and tear through their tissues, just as the X-ray ripped and tore through the tissues of so many experimenters before they learned the danger.
Before a very long time had elapsed, the village smarties began to feel an uncomfortable consciousness of not having made a very shining success out of their attempts on the simpleton from "old Shelby." Experimenters grew scarce and chary.
Also, I beg that these experimenters, or others, will set their fingers upon another pane, and add again the marks of the accused, but not placing them in the same order or relation to the other signatures as before--for, by one chance in a million, a person might happen upon the right marks by pure guesswork, ONCE, therefore I wish to be tested twice."
Together with Sidney, who was Leicester's nephew, he was for a while a member of a little group of students who called themselves 'The Areopagus' and who, like occasional other experimenters of the later Renaissance period, attempted to make over English versification by substituting for rime and accentual meter the Greek and Latin system based on exact quantity of syllables.
Studies 2 and 3 employed experimental paradigms, in which the experimenter manipulated the expectations of the participant and the participant had a subtle opportunity to aggress (or not) toward the experimenter.
In a series of experiments, children, also aged 4 to 5, were asked either to "be helpers" or "to help," and they were given the opportunity to assist the experimenter in cleaning up some toys.