expletive

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ex·ple·tive

 (ĕk′splĭ-tĭv)
n.
1. An exclamation or oath, especially one that is profane, vulgar, or obscene.
2.
a. A word or phrase that does not contribute any meaning but is added only to fill out a sentence or a metrical line.
b. Linguistics A word or other grammatical element that has no meaning but is needed to fill a syntactic position, such as the words it and there in the sentences It's raining and There are many books on the table.
adj.
Added or inserted in order to fill out something, such as a sentence or a metrical line.

[From Late Latin explētīvus, serving to fill out, from Latin explētus, past participle of explēre, to fill out : ex-, ex- + plēre, to fill; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expletive

(ɪkˈspliːtɪv)
n
1. (Linguistics) an exclamation or swearword; an oath or a sound expressing an emotional reaction rather than any particular meaning
2. (Linguistics) any syllable, word, or phrase conveying no independent meaning, esp one inserted in a line of verse for the sake of the metre
adj
expressing no particular meaning, esp when filling out a line of verse
[C17: from Late Latin explētīvus for filling out, from explēre, from plēre to fill]
exˈpletively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•ple•tive

(ˈɛk splɪ tɪv)

n.
1. an interjectory word or expression, frequently profane; an exclamatory oath.
2. a syllable, word, or phrase that serves to fill out a sentence, line of verse, etc., without conveying any meaning of its own, as the word it in It is raining.
adj.
3. Also, ex′ple•to`ry. added merely to fill out a sentence or line, give emphasis, etc.
[1600–10; < Late Latin explētīvus supplementary = Latin explēt(us), past participle of explēre to fill up (ex- ex1 + plēre to fill) + -īvus -ive]
ex′ple•tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expletive - profane or obscene expression usually of surprise or angerexpletive - profane or obscene expression usually of surprise or anger; "expletives were deleted"
profanity - vulgar or irreverent speech or action
2.expletive - a word or phrase conveying no independent meaning but added to fill out a sentence or metrical line
utterance, vocalization - the use of uttered sounds for auditory communication
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

expletive

noun swear word, curse, obscenity, oath, four-letter word, cuss (informal), profanity, rude word He muttered an expletive under his breath.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

expletive

noun
A profane or obscene term:
Informal: cuss.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
kiroussadattelutäytetäytesanatäyttävä

expletive

[eksˈpliːtɪv]
A. N (Gram) → palabra f expletiva; (= oath) → palabrota f, improperio m
B. ADJ (Gram) → expletivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expletive

[ɪkˈspliːtɪv] njuron m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expletive

n (= exclamation)Ausruf m; (= oath)Kraftausdruck m, → Fluch m; (Gram: = filler word) → Füllwort nt
adj expletive word (Gram) → Füllwort nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expletive

[ɪksˈpliːtɪv] n (frm) (swear word) → imprecazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The affair seemed to grow more complicated, and the Colonel, with his expletives and his indignation, confused rather than informed me.
No one could have repeated the field marshal's address, begun solemnly and then changing into an old man's simplehearted talk; but the hearty sincerity of that speech, the feeling of majestic triumph combined with pity for the foe and consciousness of the justice of our cause, exactly expressed by that old man's good-natured expletives, was not merely understood but lay in the soul of every soldier and found expression in their joyous and long-sustained shouts.
They were simple if not altogether innocent expletives -- imaginative phrases wherewith to round off a sentence.
Strings of expletives he swung lashlike over the backs of his men, and it was evident that his previous efforts had in nowise impaired his resources.
He hurled at the unfortunate creature the most energetic expletives in the English tongue.
In his deportment he was solemn, if not sullen; and when he spoke, which was seldom, he always delivered himself in a slow voice; and, though his sentences were short, they were still interrupted with many hums and ha's, ay ays, and other expletives: so that, though he accompanied his words with certain explanatory gestures, such as shaking or nodding the head, or pointing with his fore-finger, he generally left his hearers to understand more than he expressed; nay, he commonly gave them a hint that he knew much more than he thought proper to disclose.
His, I think, were business letters, and apparently not much to his mind, for he crushed them into his pocket with some muttered expletives that I should have reproved him for at any other time.
'scoundrel,' 'rascal,' 'insolent puppy,' and a variety of expletives no less flattering to the party addressed, with such great relish and strength of tone, that a dozen voices raised in concert under any ordinary circumstances would have made far less uproar and created much smaller consternation.
Some time elapses in the present instance before the old gentleman is sufficiently cool to resume his discourse, and even then he mixes it up with several edifying expletives addressed to the unconscious partner of his bosom, who holds communication with nothing on earth but the trivets.
He had risen to carry his decision into effect when there suddenly broke upon his ear, uttered in loud and menacing tones, a volley of German oaths and expletives among which he heard Englische schweinhunde repeated several times.
God!" Not that he was calling upon God; it was a mere expletive, but it came from his soul.
I expelled the nasty stuff with a strong English expletive and said, "Foreigner, beware!" Then this outlaw strapped his razor on his boot, hovered over me ominously for six fearful seconds, and then swooped down upon me like the genius of destruction.