exploring


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ex·plore

 (ĭk-splôr′)
v. ex·plored, ex·plor·ing, ex·plores
v.tr.
1. To investigate systematically; examine: explore every possibility.
2. To search into or travel in for the purpose of discovery: exploring outer space.
3. Medicine To examine (a body cavity or interior part) for diagnostic purposes, especially by surgery.
v.intr.
To make a careful examination or search: scientists who have been known to explore in this region of the earth.

[Latin explōrāre : ex-, ex- + perhaps plōrāre, to cry out, as to rouse game.]
References in classic literature ?
Captain Helding and the officers who were to leave with the exploring party returned to the main room on their way out.
My second lieutenant, who was to have joined the exploring party, has had a fall on the ice.
I have already, if you remember, expressed my doubts whether you are strong enough to make one of an exploring party.
Over the merciless white snow--under the merciless black sky--the exploring party began to move.
The Indian hunters of his party were in the habit of exploring all the streams along which they passed, in search of "beaver lodges," and occasionally set their traps with some success.
The boat containing the exploring party and Val Jacinto took the lead, the baggage craft following.
They may celebrate as they will the heroes of Exploring Expeditions, your Cookes, Your Krusensterns; but I say that scores of anonymous Captains have sailed out of Nantucket, that were as great, and greater than your Cooke and your Krusenstern.
Kantos Kan had been detailed to one of the small one-man fliers and had had the misfortune to be discovered by the Warhoons while exploring their city.
I made over twenty miles that day, for I was now hardened to fatigue and accustomed to long hikes, having spent considerable time hunting and exploring in the immediate vicinity of camp.
What was the meaning of that South-Sea Exploring Expedition, with all its parade and expense, but an indirect recognition of the fact that there are continents and seas in the moral world to which every man is an isthmus or an inlet, yet unexplored by him, but that it is easier to sail many thousand miles through cold and storm and cannibals, in a government ship, with five hundred men and boys to assist one, than it is to explore the private sea, the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean of one's being alone.
Exploring the World of Hummingbirds is an educational book written especially for young people ages 8-12.
Olivia found a crab the last time she went exploring.