expressionism

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ex·pres·sion·ism

or Ex·pres·sion·ism  (ĭk-sprĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in the arts during the early 1900s that emphasized distortion of external reality in order to express the artist's subjective experience.

ex·pres′sion·ist n.
ex·pres′sion·is′tic adj.
ex·pres′sion·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expressionism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (sometimes capital) an artistic and literary movement originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century, which sought to express emotions rather than to represent external reality: characterized by the use of symbolism and of exaggeration and distortion
exˈpressionist n, adj
exˌpressionˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•pres•sion•ism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n. (often cap.)
1. a style of art in which forms derived from nature are distorted and colors are intensified for expressive purposes.
2. a style in literature and theater depicting the subjective aspect of experience esp. by using symbolism and nonnaturalistic settings.
[1905–10; < German Expressionismus]
ex•pres′sion•ist, n., adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Expressionism

a movement in the 20th century that attempted to express feeling and emotion directly by distorting forms, choosing violent subject matter and harsh colors, and keeping the overall design out of balance. — Expressionist, n.Expressionistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

expressionism

(c. 1905–25) An emphasis on pictorial distortion or chromatic exaggeration within any art of any period. The movement emphasizing heightened emotion and the artist’s subjective vision, and was characterized by bold brushwork and stylized forms. Influenced by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, and Fauvism, the movement includes the more specific groups of Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expressionism - an art movement early in the 20th centuryexpressionism - an art movement early in the 20th century; the artist's subjective expression of inner experiences was emphasized; an inner feeling was expressed through a distorted rendition of reality
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
neoexpressionism - an art movement based on expressionism; developed in 1980s in Europe and United States; crudely drawn garish paintings
supra expressionism - a movement that tried to go beyond expressionism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ekspresjonisme
expressionismo

expressionism

[eksˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nexpresionismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expressionism

[ɪkˈsprɛʃənɪzəm] nexpressionnisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expressionism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expressionism

[ɪksˈprɛʃnɪzm] nespressionismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
(Kippenberger's then assistant Merlin Carpenter created the trashed paintings in his mentor's style.) Of course, Kippenberger's "expressionistically inspired analysis of the social dynamics of creative processes" (the words are Hochdorfer's) was picked up by a posse of disciples: not just Carpenter but Stephan Dillemuth, Cosima von Bonin, Heimo Zobernig, Stephen Prina, and, last but not least, the mercurial antipainter Michael Krebber (all but Dillemuth show up in this exhibition).
As Sutherland's friend John Craxton once explained to me, 'Sutherland drew expressionistically' (useful advice if you need to distinguish a real Sutherland drawing from a fake); all the energy is in the drawings.
Rather, the viewer is startled to note, the figure is expressionistically portrayed with what appears to be a death-head--that is, it has the skull shape and rictus smile associated with someone recently deceased.
A similar expression is conveyed through the painting, which expressionistically captures the bottle.
The play's careful expository arguments leading to a neat dramaturgical resolution lightly disguise its generic claim to be an expressionistically distorted 'war play'; a popular document articulating and mirroring the tormented moral chaos of the Great War and questioning the role and effects of western industrialised discourses and technologies.
Hebrew labels identifying the expressionistically executed, robed figures of Solomon and Hiram hover above the pair's heads.
The city space the young protagonists inhabit is displayed expressionistically both in Crossroads and Lonesome, as well as in Yuan's Street Angel.
A vast, thundering space rolls in upon New York City, expressionistically rendered toward the right-hand side of the painting.
A testament to the spirit of community and the interconnectedness of all humans from its title onward, Ubuntu (The Cape Town Project) expressionistically performs the story of two generations of a South African and a Canadian family as their complex associations are revealed against the backdrop of a Toronto university.
Michael Berkeley's 'Hollow Fires' combined Housman and Hardy in expressionistically Mahlerian settings, their original string quartet scoring encompassed on the piano by the amazingly busy, resourceful , deft and supportive princess among accompanists, Susie Allan.
Alison's House, for which Glaspell won a Pulitzer prize in 1931, is inspired by the life and work of Emily Dickinson, but significantly remolded in Glaspell's terms, featuring a Midwestern location, a significant, absent female character, a setting that expressionistically symbolizes her, and themes of conformity vs.