expressionism

(redirected from Expressionists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Expressionists: Dadaists, Abstract expressionists

ex·pres·sion·ism

or Ex·pres·sion·ism  (ĭk-sprĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in the arts during the early 1900s that emphasized distortion of external reality in order to express the artist's subjective experience.

ex·pres′sion·ist n.
ex·pres′sion·is′tic adj.
ex·pres′sion·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

expressionism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (sometimes capital) an artistic and literary movement originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century, which sought to express emotions rather than to represent external reality: characterized by the use of symbolism and of exaggeration and distortion
exˈpressionist n, adj
exˌpressionˈistic adj

ex•pres•sion•ism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n. (often cap.)
1. a style of art in which forms derived from nature are distorted and colors are intensified for expressive purposes.
2. a style in literature and theater depicting the subjective aspect of experience esp. by using symbolism and nonnaturalistic settings.
[1905–10; < German Expressionismus]
ex•pres′sion•ist, n., adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Expressionism

a movement in the 20th century that attempted to express feeling and emotion directly by distorting forms, choosing violent subject matter and harsh colors, and keeping the overall design out of balance. — Expressionist, n.Expressionistic, adj.
See also: Art

expressionism

(c. 1905–25) An emphasis on pictorial distortion or chromatic exaggeration within any art of any period. The movement emphasizing heightened emotion and the artist’s subjective vision, and was characterized by bold brushwork and stylized forms. Influenced by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, and Fauvism, the movement includes the more specific groups of Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expressionism - an art movement early in the 20th centuryexpressionism - an art movement early in the 20th century; the artist's subjective expression of inner experiences was emphasized; an inner feeling was expressed through a distorted rendition of reality
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
neoexpressionism - an art movement based on expressionism; developed in 1980s in Europe and United States; crudely drawn garish paintings
supra expressionism - a movement that tried to go beyond expressionism
Translations
ekspresjonisme
expressionismo

expressionism

[eksˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nexpresionismo m

expressionism

[ɪkˈsprɛʃənɪzəm] nexpressionnisme m

expressionism

expressionism

[ɪksˈprɛʃnɪzm] nespressionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Alexei Jawlensky", art expert Vivian Barnet focuses specifically on one of the lesser known Expressionist artists of the Blue Rider movement in a richly illustrated volume that presents the colorful paintings illustrating how the artist was influenced, apart from the German Expressionists, by the art of Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Paul Cezanne, Henri Matisse and the Fauves, and by Ferdinand Hodler.
The generation of poets preceding the generation of expressionists had been gifted with strong imaginative personalities and illustrious translators (cf.
Expressionists lack a proscriptive list of desirables that might guarantee the credibility of their work.
Once the textual expositions start, Krause investigates lesser-known Expressionists, such as Gottfried Kolwel, Arnolt Bronnen, Emmy Hennings, with prose as well as poetry in view.
Many young North American artists had studied in Europe before the war and several of them became Expressionists.
This video, from the publisher's American Painter Series, features the life and work of De Kooning, other abstract expressionists such as Pollock, Kline, and Gorky, and fellow members of the New York school of painting in the 1940s.
These expressionists are avant--garde, he argues, not only in their interrogations of convention, but also in their deconstruction of the ideology (and institution) of art.
The Abstract Expressionists discovered that to make a lithograph, all you have to do is draw freely on the lithograph stone to create a `free-form image.
Expressionists takes us inside an artists' tenement in Paris populated by a dwarf, a giant woman and various artists swimming in the agony and ecstasy of their creations.
The Fuhrer made the speech at an exhibition of "degenerate" art at the Haus der Kunst in Munich which featured many of Beckmann's pictures, among those of other expressionists.
Cooler and more intellectualized than the abstract expressionists, or even the pop artists, these art school-trained 20- and 30-somethings began making art the subject of which was the making of art itself.
Of special importance was the work of Karl Kraus and his periodical Die Fackel, the only significant periodical in critical opposition to established values in Vienna prior to the less successful but nevertheless important smaller periodicals of the Austrian expressionists.