expressive


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Related to expressive: Expressive language disorder

ex·pres·sive

 (ĭk-sprĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by expression: a child's expressive ability.
2. Serving to express or indicate meaning or feeling: actions expressive of frustration.
3. Showing or communicating meaning or feeling effectively: an expressive glance.

ex·pres′sive·ly adv.
ex·pres′sive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expressive

(ɪkˈsprɛsɪv)
adj
1. of, involving, or full of expression
2. (foll by: of) indicative or suggestive (of): a look expressive of love.
3. having a particular meaning, feeling, or force; significant
exˈpressively adv
exˈpressiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•pres•sive

(ɪkˈsprɛs ɪv)

adj.
1. full of expression; meaningful: an expressive shrug.
2. serving to express: a look expressive of gratitude.
3. of, pertaining to, or concerned with expression: Dance is a highly expressive art.
4. of or pertaining to linguistic forms in which sounds denote a semantic field directly and nonarbitrarily through sound symbolism, as in onomatopoeia and emotionally charged words such as hypocoristics and pejoratives.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French]
ex•pres′sive•ly, adv.
ex•pres′sive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.expressive - characterized by expressionexpressive - characterized by expression; "a very expressive face"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

expressive

adjective
2. meaningful, indicative, suggestive, demonstrative, revealing, significant, allusive All his poems are expressive of his love for nature.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

expressive

adjective
Effectively conveying meaning, feeling, or mood:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُعَبِّر
expresivní
udtryksfuld
ilmaiseva
sem lætur í ljósi; sem segir mikiî
anlamlı

expressive

[ɪksˈpresɪv] ADJ [person, face, language] → expresivo; [ability] → de expresión
to be expressive of sth (frm) → expresar algo
his gesture was expressive of angersu gesto expresaba rabia
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expressive

[ɪkˈsprɛsɪv] adj
[face] → expressif/ive; [person] → expressif/ive
expressive of (= expressing) → qui exprime
to be expressive of sth → exprimer qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expressive

adj eyes, face, voiceausdrucksvoll; glance, lookvielsagend; gestures, painting, musicausdrucksvoll, expressiv (geh); languageausdrucksstark; expressive danceAusdruckstanz m; your eyes are your most expressive featuredeine Augen sind das Ausdrucksvollste an dir; to be expressive of something (form)etw ausdrücken; the French term seemed more expressive of what she feltdas französische Wort schien ihre Gefühle besser auszudrücken or genauer wiederzugeben; expressive powers/abilitiesAusdrucksfähigkeit for -vermögen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expressive

[ɪksˈprɛsɪv] adj (look, face, language) → espressivo/a; (gesture) → eloquente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

express

(ikˈspres) verb
1. to put into words. He expressed his ideas very clearly.
2. (with oneself etc) to put one's own thoughts into words. You haven't expressed yourself clearly.
3. to show (thoughts, feelings etc) by looks, actions etc. She nodded to express her agreement.
4. to send by fast (postal) delivery. Will you express this letter, please?
adjective
1. travelling, carrying goods etc, especially fast. an express train; express delivery.
2. clearly stated. You have disobeyed my express wishes.
adverb
by express train or fast delivery service. Send your letter express.
noun
1. an express train. the London to Cardiff express.
2. the service provided eg by the post office for carrying goods etc quickly. The parcel was sent by express.
exˈpressly adverb
in clear, definite words. I expressly forbade you to do that.
exˈpression (-ʃən) noun
1. a look on one's face that shows one's feelings. He always has a bored expression on his face.
2. a word or phrase. `Dough' is a slang expression for `money`.
3. (a) showing of thoughts or feelings by words, actions etc. This poem is an expression of his grief.
4. the showing of feeling when eg reciting, reading aloud or playing a musical instrument. Put more expression into your playing!
exˈpressionless adjective
(of a face or voice) showing no feeling. a cold, expressionless tone.
exˈpressive (-siv) adjective
showing meaning or feeling clearly. She has an expressive look on her face.
exˈpressiveness noun
exˈpressively adverb
exˈpressway noun
a divided highway; a motorway.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

expressive

adj expresivo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Again, if you string together a set of speeches expressive of character, and well finished in point of diction and thought, you will not produce thc essential tragic effect nearly so well as with a play which, however deficient in these respects, yet has a plot and artistically constructed incidents.
For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes, Brightly expressive as the twins of Loeda, Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
The slender expressive fingers, forever active, for- ever striving to conceal themselves in his pockets or behind his back, came forth and became the piston rods of his machinery of expression.
To follow that way is an initiation, by which they will become able to distinguish, in art, speech, feeling, manners, in men and life generally, what is genuine, animated, and expressive from what is only conventional and derivative, and therefore inexpressive.
Our bashful fears, our silent interjections, our blushes, as we met each other's eyes, were expressive with an eloquence, a boyish charm, which I have ceased to feel.
But, his popular name was Rumty, which in a moment of inspiration had been bestowed upon him by a gentleman of convivial habits connected with the drug-markets, as the beginning of a social chorus, his leading part in the execution of which had led this gentleman to the Temple of Fame, and of which the whole expressive burden ran: 'Rumty iddity, row dow dow, Sing toodlely, teedlely, bow wow wow.'
Here now's the very dreaded symbol of grim death, by a mere hap, made the expressive sign of the help and hope of most endangered life.
Phileas Fogg was, indeed, exactitude personified, and this was betrayed even in the expression of his very hands and feet; for in men, as well as in animals, the limbs themselves are expressive of the passions.
Other singers are there, to be sure, to whom only the full house maketh the voice soft, the hand eloquent, the eye expressive, the heart wakeful:-- those do I not resemble.--
On the contrary, when Kitty looked at him in society, as one sometimes looks at those one loves, trying to see him as if he were a stranger, so as to catch the impression he must make on others, she saw with a panic even of jealous fear that he was far indeed from being a pitiable figure, that he was very attractive with his fine breeding, his rather old-fashioned, reserved courtesy with women, his powerful figure, and striking, as she thought, and expressive face.
Affery, woman,' said Mr Flintwinch, with a friendly grin on his expressive countenance, 'if you ever have a dream of this sort again, it'll be a sign of your being in want of physic.
The former was seated on the end of a mossy log, in a posture that permitted him to heighten the effect of his earnest language, by the calm but expressive gestures of an Indian engaged in debate.