expressive style


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expressive style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or periodexpressive style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
communication - something that is communicated by or to or between people or groups
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
analysis - the use of closed-class words instead of inflections: e.g., `the father of the bride' instead of `the bride's father'
bathos - triteness or triviality of style
black humor, black humour - the juxtaposition of morbid and farcical elements (in writing or drama) to give a disturbing effect
device - something in an artistic work designed to achieve a particular effect
eloquence, fluency, smoothness - powerful and effective language; "his eloquence attracted a large congregation"; "fluency in spoken and written English is essential"; "his oily smoothness concealed his guilt from the police"
euphuism - any artificially elegant style of language
flatness - a want of animation or brilliance; "the almost self-conscious flatness of Hemingway's style"
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
grandiloquence, grandiosity, magniloquence, ornateness, rhetoric - high-flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation; "the grandiosity of his prose"; "an excessive ornateness of language"
headlinese - using the abbreviated style of headline writers
jargon - specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
journalese - the style in which newspapers are written
legalese - a style that uses the abstruse technical vocabulary of the law
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
music genre, musical genre, musical style, genre - an expressive style of music
officialese - the style of writing characteristic of some government officials: formal and obscure
pathos - a style that has the power to evoke feelings
prose - matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression
rhetoric - using language effectively to please or persuade
coarseness, saltiness - language or humor that is down-to-earth; "the saltiness of their language was inappropriate"; "self-parody and saltiness riddled their core genre"
self-expression - the expression of one's individuality (usually through creative activities)
sesquipedality - using long words
terseness - a neatly short and concise expressive style
turn of expression, turn of phrase - a distinctive spoken or written expression; "John's succinct turn of phrase persuaded her that it would not be a good idea"
vein - a distinctive style or manner; "he continued in this vein for several minutes"
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words
literary genre, writing style, genre - a style of expressing yourself in writing
poetry - any communication resembling poetry in beauty or the evocation of feeling
References in periodicals archive ?
Keown said Wenger's expressive style of play was aimed at emulatingBarcelona- but the former centre-back insists the French manager didn't get the balance right.
Alfred used softer and rounder lines in his designs, whereas Manfred had a more angular, expressive style.
Her expressive style, dance moves along with singing was a treat to eyes.
In this meditation on the transience of fame, Rembrandt contrasts worldly renown with enduring artistic achievement at a time when his own somber and expressive style was beginning to fall out of fashion.
"We were working on the project in the first place (the suits), and after the picture (official players picture), we doubled our efforts to accept a more expressive style of our heritage," Wissam Ben Omar, a designer, said.
A person with an expressive style mostly speaks at a faster pace making statements and is big-picture-focused, casual and informal.
An aggressive looking front bumper and grille and pronounced side character lines give the new Camry a far more expressive style. It's a sleeker look that's also slightly longer and communicates a dynamic stance and presence.
The artist creates this world with her striking abstract work in an expressive style. Thick and thin layering of oil paint, and the various surface textures, reflect the artist's motion while making the work.
He was also known for his wonderfully vibrant narrative art, depicting fluid scenes from New York--large canvases of people and places and events from the city and beyond, crowded street scenes and parades and the full flowing flavor of New York--painted in his own unique, expressive style that was so familiar to those in the art world who knew his work.
There's the grace of ballet, the expressive style of modern dance, jazz dance, the street dance styles of hip-hop, the Cuban dance of salsa, traditional folk dance, and the Dominican dance merengue.
Revered today is justifiably considered to be the greatest sculptor of all time, an artist whose expressive style prefigured that of the modernist movement and abstract sculpture, Auguste Rodin (1840--1917) stirred up much controversy during his lifetime, and his sculptures often met with hostility and incomprehension from his peers.