expropriate

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Related to expropriatory: Creeping expropriation

ex·pro·pri·ate

 (ĕk-sprō′prē-āt′)
tr.v. ex·pro·pri·at·ed, ex·pro·pri·at·ing, ex·pro·pri·ates
To take (a property) for public use.

[Medieval Latin expropriāre, expropriāt- : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin propriāre, to appropriate (from proprius, one's own; see proper).]

ex·pro′pri·a′tion n.
ex·pro′pri·a′tor n.
ex·pro′pri·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expropriate

(ɛksˈprəʊprɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
(Law) to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public use. See also eminent domain
[C17: from Medieval Latin expropriāre to deprive of possessions, from proprius own]
exˈpropriable adj
exˌpropriˈation n
exˈpropriˌator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•pro•pri•ate

(ɛksˈproʊ priˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to take possession of, esp. for public use.
2. to dispossess (a person) of ownership.
3. to take from another and use as one's own: expropriated ideas.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin expropriātus, past participle of expropriāre to deprive of property = Latin ex- ex-1 + Medieval Latin propriāre to appropriate]
ex•pro′pri•a•ble (-ə bəl) adj.
ex•pro`pri•a′tion, n.
ex•pro′pri•a`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

expropriate


Past participle: expropriated
Gerund: expropriating

Imperative
expropriate
expropriate
Present
I expropriate
you expropriate
he/she/it expropriates
we expropriate
you expropriate
they expropriate
Preterite
I expropriated
you expropriated
he/she/it expropriated
we expropriated
you expropriated
they expropriated
Present Continuous
I am expropriating
you are expropriating
he/she/it is expropriating
we are expropriating
you are expropriating
they are expropriating
Present Perfect
I have expropriated
you have expropriated
he/she/it has expropriated
we have expropriated
you have expropriated
they have expropriated
Past Continuous
I was expropriating
you were expropriating
he/she/it was expropriating
we were expropriating
you were expropriating
they were expropriating
Past Perfect
I had expropriated
you had expropriated
he/she/it had expropriated
we had expropriated
you had expropriated
they had expropriated
Future
I will expropriate
you will expropriate
he/she/it will expropriate
we will expropriate
you will expropriate
they will expropriate
Future Perfect
I will have expropriated
you will have expropriated
he/she/it will have expropriated
we will have expropriated
you will have expropriated
they will have expropriated
Future Continuous
I will be expropriating
you will be expropriating
he/she/it will be expropriating
we will be expropriating
you will be expropriating
they will be expropriating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been expropriating
you have been expropriating
he/she/it has been expropriating
we have been expropriating
you have been expropriating
they have been expropriating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been expropriating
you will have been expropriating
he/she/it will have been expropriating
we will have been expropriating
you will have been expropriating
they will have been expropriating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been expropriating
you had been expropriating
he/she/it had been expropriating
we had been expropriating
you had been expropriating
they had been expropriating
Conditional
I would expropriate
you would expropriate
he/she/it would expropriate
we would expropriate
you would expropriate
they would expropriate
Past Conditional
I would have expropriated
you would have expropriated
he/she/it would have expropriated
we would have expropriated
you would have expropriated
they would have expropriated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.expropriate - deprive of possessions; "The Communist government expropriated the landowners"
deprive, divest, strip - take away possessions from someone; "The Nazis stripped the Jews of all their assets"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

expropriate

verb (Formal) seize, take, appropriate, confiscate, assume, take over, take away, commandeer, requisition, arrogate The Bolsheviks expropriated the property of the landowners.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

expropriate

verb
To take quick and forcible possession of:
Idiom: help oneself to.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
vyvlastnit
pakkolunastaa

expropriate

[eksˈprəʊprɪeɪt] VTexpropiar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expropriate

[ɛkˈsprəʊprieɪt] vtexproprier
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expropriate

vtenteignen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expropriate

[ɛksˈprəʊprɪˌeɪt] vtespropriare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
government acts with expropriatory intent, i.e., that government action
USA, the tribunal incorporated proportionality analysis in the context of indirect regulatory expropriation by stating that "as a matter of general international law, a non-discriminatory regulation for a public purpose, which is enacted in accordance with due process and, which affects, inter alias, a foreign investor or investment is not deemed expropriatory and compensable." (183) In UPS v.
Though the term hefker does not appear in the Bible, its origins are often traced back to the biblical ban (herem) and the expropriatory powers of political leadership.
But as a matter of general international law, a non-discriminatory regulation for a public purpose, which is enacted in accordance with due process and, which affects, inter alios, a foreign investor or investment is not deemed expropriatory and compensable unless specific commitments had been given by the regulating government to the then putative foreign investor contemplating investment that the government would refrain from such regulation.
In the field of foreign direct investment, private parties such as corporations now routinely invoke 'due process of law' conditions commonly included in bilateral investment treaties as a shield against expropriatory action by governments.
(110) As explained by the Pope & Talbot tribunal "much creeping expropriation could be conducted by regulation and a blanket exception for regulatory measures would create a gaping loophole in international protections against expropriation." (111) It follows that the form of measure is not determinative to the existence of expropriation and the formal characterisation or status of a government measure will not prevent a tribunal from assessing whether it is expropriatory or not.
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and Bolivian President Evo Morales, for example, both enforced multiple expropriatory actions of foreign-owned businesses in the natural resource sector in the name of "the people" when they first came to office.
Russia Final Award noted that the applicable treaty expressly clarified that shareholders, be they majority or minority shareholders, also have a claim for protection under Article 5 if expropriatory measures that fall under paragraph (1) are taken "only" against the company and not directly against the shareholders themselves.
Such measures may easily have an expropriatory effect, even when the amount of tax that is recovered is in itself not confiscatory.
(94) In the judgment, Lord Sumner provided that "it is to be presumed, in the absence of express confiscation or of subsequent expropriatory legislation, that the conqueror has respected them and forborne to diminish or modify them." (95) Therefore, when a territory is conquered, the laws of the previously sovereign power continue until extinguished by direct action or the passing of legislation.