expurgate

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ex·pur·gate

 (ĕk′spər-gāt′)
tr.v. ex·pur·gat·ed, ex·pur·gat·ing, ex·pur·gates
To remove erroneous, vulgar, obscene, or otherwise objectionable material from (a book, for example) before publication.

[Latin expūrgāre, expūrgāt-, to purify : ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + pūrgāre, to cleanse; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′pur·ga′tion n.
ex′pur·ga′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expurgate

(ˈɛkspəˌɡeɪt)
vb
(Journalism & Publishing) (tr) to amend (a book, text, etc) by removing (obscene or offensive sections)
[C17: from Latin expurgāre to clean out, from purgāre to purify; see purge]
ˌexpurˈgation n
ˈexpurˌgator n
expurgatory, expurgatorial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•pur•gate

(ˈɛk spərˌgeɪt)

v.t. -gat•ed, -gat•ing.
1. to amend by removing words deemed objectionable.
2. to purge of something morally offensive.
[1615–25; < Latin expurgātus, past participle of expurgāre to cleanse, clear away]
ex`pur•ga′tion, n.
ex′pur•ga`tor, n.
ex•pur•ga•to•ri•al (ɪkˌspɜr gəˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) ex•pur′ga•to`ry, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

expurgate


Past participle: expurgated
Gerund: expurgating

Imperative
expurgate
expurgate
Present
I expurgate
you expurgate
he/she/it expurgates
we expurgate
you expurgate
they expurgate
Preterite
I expurgated
you expurgated
he/she/it expurgated
we expurgated
you expurgated
they expurgated
Present Continuous
I am expurgating
you are expurgating
he/she/it is expurgating
we are expurgating
you are expurgating
they are expurgating
Present Perfect
I have expurgated
you have expurgated
he/she/it has expurgated
we have expurgated
you have expurgated
they have expurgated
Past Continuous
I was expurgating
you were expurgating
he/she/it was expurgating
we were expurgating
you were expurgating
they were expurgating
Past Perfect
I had expurgated
you had expurgated
he/she/it had expurgated
we had expurgated
you had expurgated
they had expurgated
Future
I will expurgate
you will expurgate
he/she/it will expurgate
we will expurgate
you will expurgate
they will expurgate
Future Perfect
I will have expurgated
you will have expurgated
he/she/it will have expurgated
we will have expurgated
you will have expurgated
they will have expurgated
Future Continuous
I will be expurgating
you will be expurgating
he/she/it will be expurgating
we will be expurgating
you will be expurgating
they will be expurgating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been expurgating
you have been expurgating
he/she/it has been expurgating
we have been expurgating
you have been expurgating
they have been expurgating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been expurgating
you will have been expurgating
he/she/it will have been expurgating
we will have been expurgating
you will have been expurgating
they will have been expurgating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been expurgating
you had been expurgating
he/she/it had been expurgating
we had been expurgating
you had been expurgating
they had been expurgating
Conditional
I would expurgate
you would expurgate
he/she/it would expurgate
we would expurgate
you would expurgate
they would expurgate
Past Conditional
I would have expurgated
you would have expurgated
he/she/it would have expurgated
we would have expurgated
you would have expurgated
they would have expurgated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.expurgate - edit by omitting or modifying parts considered indelicate; "bowdlerize a novel"
abbreviate, abridge, foreshorten, shorten, contract, reduce, cut - reduce in scope while retaining essential elements; "The manuscript must be shortened"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

expurgate

verb censor, cut, clean up (informal), purge, purify, blue-pencil, sanitize, bowdlerize The work was heavily expurgated for its second edition.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

expurgate

verb
To examine (material) and remove parts considered harmful or improper for publication or transmission:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

expurgate

[ˈekspɜːgeɪt] VTexpurgar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expurgate

[ˈɛkspərgeɪt] vt (= censor) → expurger
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expurgate

vtzensieren, die anstößigen Stellen entfernen aus; expurgated editiongereinigte Fassung
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expurgate

[ˈɛkspəˌgeɪt] vt (frm) → espurgare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Leah Price's The Anthology' and the Rise of the Novel, for instance, argues that reviews are related to abridgments, compilations, expurgations, and extracts, genres whose function is "to represent another text in miniature" (145).
Fitzgerald started with Heseltine, these expurgations may have prompted
But with its new title and expurgations, including a bluntly truncated final paragraph and the complete omission of Harington's ' Occasion why' concerning royalist assertions and unreserved statements of fealty, the Supplie had lost its political relevance.
Indeed, Max Brod has become the whipping boy of the current generation of scholars who have gained access to Kafka's original manuscripts and identified Brod's expurgations. They miss no opportunity to malign "Dearest Max." The Nobelist J.M.
Supple commissioned a new translation of the stories from Lebanese feminist author Hanan al-Shaykh, intending to remove the elaborations and expurgations that have crept in over the centuries.
"A few necessary expurgations have been made without further comment," she sniffs in her introduction.