extenuate

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ex·ten·u·ate

 (ĭk-stĕn′yo͞o-āt′)
tr.v. ex·ten·u·at·ed, ex·ten·u·at·ing, ex·ten·u·ates
1. To lessen or appear to lessen the seriousness or extent of (an offense, for example), especially by providing partial excuses: extenuated his crime as part of his testimony.
2. Archaic
a. To make thin or emaciated.
b. To mitigate or lessen.
c. To belittle; disparage.

[Latin extenuāre, extenuāt- : ex-, ex- + tenuāre, to make thin (from tenuis, thin; see ten- in Indo-European roots).]

ex·ten′u·a′tive adj. & n.
ex·ten′u·a′tor n.
ex·ten′u·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

extenuate

(ɪkˈstɛnjʊˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to represent (an offence, a fault, etc) as being less serious than it appears, as by showing mitigating circumstances
2. to cause to be or appear less serious; mitigate
3. to underestimate or make light of
4. archaic
a. to emaciate or weaken
b. to dilute or thin out
[C16: from Latin extenuāre to make thin, from tenuis thin, frail]
exˈtenuˌating adj
exˈtenuˌatingly adv
exˌtenuˈation n
exˈtenuˌator n
exˈtenuatory adj

ex•ten•u•ate

(ɪkˈstɛn yuˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to make or try to make seem less serious esp. by offering excuses: extenuating circumstances.
2. Archaic.
a. to make light of.
b. to make thin, lean, or emaciated.
c. to reduce the consistency or density of.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin extenuātus, past participle of extenuāre=ex- ex-1 + tenuāre to make thin]
ex•ten′u•at`ing•ly, adv.
ex•ten′u•a`tive, ex•ten′u•a•to`ry (-əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ex•ten′u•a`tor, n.

extenuate

- Comes from the Latin verb extenuare, "make thin or lean," and originally meant "to treat as of small importance, make light of."
See also related terms for lean.

extenuate


Past participle: extenuated
Gerund: extenuating

Imperative
extenuate
extenuate
Present
I extenuate
you extenuate
he/she/it extenuates
we extenuate
you extenuate
they extenuate
Preterite
I extenuated
you extenuated
he/she/it extenuated
we extenuated
you extenuated
they extenuated
Present Continuous
I am extenuating
you are extenuating
he/she/it is extenuating
we are extenuating
you are extenuating
they are extenuating
Present Perfect
I have extenuated
you have extenuated
he/she/it has extenuated
we have extenuated
you have extenuated
they have extenuated
Past Continuous
I was extenuating
you were extenuating
he/she/it was extenuating
we were extenuating
you were extenuating
they were extenuating
Past Perfect
I had extenuated
you had extenuated
he/she/it had extenuated
we had extenuated
you had extenuated
they had extenuated
Future
I will extenuate
you will extenuate
he/she/it will extenuate
we will extenuate
you will extenuate
they will extenuate
Future Perfect
I will have extenuated
you will have extenuated
he/she/it will have extenuated
we will have extenuated
you will have extenuated
they will have extenuated
Future Continuous
I will be extenuating
you will be extenuating
he/she/it will be extenuating
we will be extenuating
you will be extenuating
they will be extenuating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been extenuating
you have been extenuating
he/she/it has been extenuating
we have been extenuating
you have been extenuating
they have been extenuating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been extenuating
you will have been extenuating
he/she/it will have been extenuating
we will have been extenuating
you will have been extenuating
they will have been extenuating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been extenuating
you had been extenuating
he/she/it had been extenuating
we had been extenuating
you had been extenuating
they had been extenuating
Conditional
I would extenuate
you would extenuate
he/she/it would extenuate
we would extenuate
you would extenuate
they would extenuate
Past Conditional
I would have extenuated
you would have extenuated
he/she/it would have extenuated
we would have extenuated
you would have extenuated
they would have extenuated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.extenuate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent ofextenuate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of; "The circumstances extenuate the crime"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
apologise, rationalize, apologize, rationalise, justify, excuse - defend, explain, clear away, or make excuses for by reasoning; "rationalize the child's seemingly crazy behavior"; "he rationalized his lack of success"

extenuate

verb
1. To conceal or make light of a fault or offense:
2. Archaic. To make physically thin or thinner:
Translations

extenuate

[eksˈtenjʊeɪt] VTatenuar, mitigar, disminuir (la gravedad de)

extenuate

vt guiltverringern, mindern; offence, conductbeschönigen; extenuating circumstancesmildernde Umstände

extenuate

vt. mitigar, atenuar, disminuir.
References in classic literature ?
The circumstances of his marriage, too, were found to admit of much extenuation.
She turned white in the face, and drew her breath through her teeth in a savage sort of way; - but she offered no extenuation or defence; and with a kind of shameless calmness - shocking indeed to witness in one so young - as good as told me that my remonstrance was unavailing, and my pastoral advice quite thrown away upon her - nay, that my very presence was displeasing while I spoke such things.
Broadsides in the streets, signed with her father's name, exonerating the late Stephen Blackpool, weaver, from misplaced suspicion, and publishing the guilt of his own son, with such extenuation as his years and temptation (he could not bring himself to add, his education) might beseech; were of the Present.
Were such a man once more to fall, what plea could be urged in extenuation of his crime?
Forgive me, and let the greatness and the purity of my love for you plead in extenuation of my act.
I remember, when I was once interceding with the emperor for a criminal who had wronged his master of a great sum of money, which he had received by order and ran away with; and happening to tell his majesty, by way of extenuation, that it was only a breach of trust, the emperor thought it monstrous in me to offer as a defence the greatest aggravation of the crime; and truly I had little to say in return, farther than the common answer, that different nations had different customs; for, I confess, I was heartily ashamed.