exteriority


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ex·te·ri·or·i·ty

 (ĭk-stîr′ē-ôr′ĭ-tē, -ŏr′-)
n.
Outwardness; externality.

exteriority

(ɪkˈstɪərɪˈɒrɪtɪ)
n
the state of being outside or external
References in periodicals archive ?
19) Ong reveals masculinity in the natural order as characterized by expendability, agonistic differentiation, and exteriority.
Both action and production are subjected to the dualistic constraints of interiority and exteriority.
Thus, we get such distended phrases as "incarnational situatedness," "ontological escapism," "reductionist containers of anonymity" and "the realm of communal exteriority.
Escape from the captivity of objects, from the constraint of the radical exteriority of the objects embellishing our world, stems from the human need for reflection and interiorization, the return to the spiritualization of objects and the adequate valorization of human beings, in particular.
Removed from all exteriority, the secret must be learned "by heart" without any "semantic comprehension" (1995, 97): this is the very essence of devotion to God.
6) Emmanuel Levinas, Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, trans.
Given the backdrop of his youthful education in the local squatter scene, for him, transparency and opacity, exteriority and inferiority, organization and corruption are conditions to negotiate as much as features to employ.
By virtue of its exteriority to any reflective order or system, pre-reflective feeling may be mobilized by the "physiological absolute" of drive as a source of intrasystemic perturbation, as a generator or motor of multiplicity and differentiation that prevents any reflective order from becoming the final "absolute" one.
Embodying Technesis argues that Derrida 'defines exteriority as the "exteriority of meaning"' but the sentence cited from Of Grammatology actually reads '[t]he epoch of the logos thus debases writing considered as mediation of mediation and as a fall into the exteriority of meaning' (Embodying Technesis, p126).
Interiority and exteriority combine; her interest is not merely domestic but structural as well.
If language is the expression of otherness, cloaked in words and symbols of the ethical command--"Thou shalt not kill" for example--then there is a locatable relation here with an anarchical exteriority.