extraction


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Related to extraction: Solvent extraction

ex·trac·tion

 (ĭk-străk′shən)
n.
1. The act of extracting or the condition of being extracted.
2. Something obtained by extracting; an extract.
3. Origin; lineage: of Spanish extraction.

extraction

(ɪkˈstrækʃən)
n
1. the act of extracting or the condition of being extracted
2. something extracted; an extract
3. (Dentistry)
a. the act or an instance of extracting a tooth or teeth
b. a tooth or teeth extracted
4. (Sociology) origin, descent, lineage, or ancestry: of German extraction.

ex•trac•tion

(ɪkˈstræk ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of extracting something.
2. descent; ancestry: of foreign extraction.
3. something extracted; extract.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extraction - the process of obtaining something from a mixture or compound by chemical or physical or mechanical meansextraction - the process of obtaining something from a mixture or compound by chemical or physical or mechanical means
decoction - (pharmacology) the extraction of water-soluble drug substances by boiling
drying up, evaporation, desiccation, dehydration - the process of extracting moisture
elution - the process of extracting one material from another by washing with a solvent to remove adsorbed material from an adsorbent (as in washing of loaded ion-exchange resins to remove captured ions); used to obtain uranium ions
infusion - the process of extracting certain active properties (as a drug from a plant) by steeping or soaking (usually in water)
beneficiation, mineral dressing, mineral extraction, mineral processing, ore dressing, ore processing - crushing and separating ore into valuable substances or waste by any of a variety of techniques
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.extraction - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
ancestry, filiation, lineage, derivation - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
full blood - descent from parents both of one pure breed
3.extraction - the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force)extraction - the action of taking out something (especially using effort or force); "the dentist gave her a local anesthetic prior to the extraction"
remotion, removal - the act of removing; "he had surgery for the removal of a malignancy"

extraction

noun
1. origin, family, ancestry, descent, race, stock, blood, birth, pedigree, lineage, parentage, derivation He married a young lady of Indian extraction.
2. taking out, drawing, pulling, withdrawal, removal, uprooting, extirpation the extraction of wisdom teeth
3. distillation, separation, derivation High temperatures are used during the extraction of cooking oils.

extraction

noun
One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
Translations
أصْل، نَسَبإقْتِلاع سِن
afstamningoprindelseudtrækning
uppruni; ætterniútdráttur

extraction

[ɪksˈtrækʃən] N (gen) → extracción f
of Spanish extractionde extracción española

extraction

[ɪkˈstrækʃən] n
(= descent) to be of Scottish extraction → être d'origine écossaise
Welsh by extraction → d'origine galloise
[tooth] → extraction f
[mineral, coal] → extraction f

extraction

n
(= process of extracting)Herausnehmen nt; (of cork etc)(Heraus)ziehen nt; (of juice, minerals, oil, DNA, energy)Gewinnung f; (of bullet, foreign body)Entfernung f; (of information, secrets)Entlocken nt; (of confession, money) → Herausholen nt; (of permission, promise, concession)Abringen nt, → Erlangen nt
(Dentistry: = act of extracting) → (Zahn)ziehen nt, → Extraktion f (spec); he had to have an extractionihm musste ein Zahn gezogen werden
(= descent)Herkunft f, → Abstammung f; of Spanish extractionspanischer Herkunft or Abstammung

extraction

[ɪksˈtrækʃn] nestrazione f; (descent) → origine f
of German extraction → di origine tedesca

extract

(ikˈstrӕkt) verb
1. to pull out, or draw out, especially by force or with effort. I have to have a tooth extracted; Did you manage to extract the information from her?
2. to select (passages from a book etc).
3. to take out (a substance forming part of something else) by crushing or by chemical means. Vanilla essence is extracted from vanilla beans.
(ˈekstrӕkt) noun
1. a passage selected from a book etc. a short extract from his novel.
2. a substance obtained by an extracting process. beef/yeast extract; extract of malt.
exˈtraction (-ʃən) noun
1. race or parentage. He is of Greek extraction.
2. (an) act of extracting eg a tooth.

ex·trac·tion

n. extracción, proceso de extraer, separar o sacar afuera.

extraction

n (dent, etc.) extracción f
References in classic literature ?
When the American enters on the history of his ancestors, he is driven, after some ten or twelve generations at most, to seek refuge in a country in Europe; whereas exactly the reverse is the case with us, our most remote extraction being American, while our more recent construction and education have taken place in Europe.
I accordingly engaged a room in the house of a lady of pure French extraction and education, who supplements the shortcomings of an income insufficient to the ever-growing demands of the Parisian system of sense-gratification, by providing food and lodging for a limited number of distinguished strangers.
Nor is it the white man alone that thus acts the destroyer; the Polynesian of Malay extraction has in parts of the East Indian archipelago, thus driven before him the dark-coloured native.
Ned looked around for a reason for this, and observed a man, evidently of Spanish extraction, passing them as he paced up and down the deck.
Society is hopelessly snobbish, and this fact of your extraction may make an appreciable difference to its acceptance of you as my wife, after I have made you the well-read woman that I mean to make you.
Prince," he said, "what should you declare, then, if I told you that a man of obvious Japanese extraction was seen to enter your house on the morning after the murder, and that he was a person to whom certain circumstances pointed as being concerned in that deed?
He discovered that it was necessary to perform a very slight operation, merely the extraction of a splinter of wood.
Saxon went in and interviewed the shopkeeper, an emaciated, shrewd-eyed and middle-aged woman of foreign extraction.
Just as it belonged to his boastfulness to depreciate his own extraction, so it belonged to it to exalt Mrs.
The cheese we had in use at that time was of purely Dutch extraction.
How the virtuous servant, Cly, was his friend and partner, and was worthy to be; how the watchful eyes of those forgers and false swearers had rested on the prisoner as a victim, because some family affairs in France, he being of French extraction, did require his making those passages across the Channel--though what those affairs were, a consideration for others who were near and dear to him, forbade him, even for his life, to disclose.
More than once she thought of revealing all to her grandmother, and she would not have hesitated a moment, if Maximilian Morrel had been named Albert de Morcerf or Raoul de Chateau-Renaud; but Morrel was of plebeian extraction, and Valentine knew how the haughty Marquise de Saint-Meran despised all who were not noble.