extralinguistic

extralinguistic

(ˌɛkstrəlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪk)
adj
not involving language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extralinguistic - not included within the realm of language
References in periodicals archive ?
Nonetheless, Carnap fails to recognize the internal link between meaning and validity, a connection firstly emphasized by Frege and, later, in Russell's theory of correspondence, which links atomic propositions to extralinguistic reality.
Information is transmitted from a speaker to a perceiver through a variety of means; supresegmentals play a major role in interpreting utterance meaning by virtue of their interrelation with extralinguistic reality.
Eco describes how the extralinguistic elements of poetic form--number of syllables, stress pattern, rhyme schemes, "phonosymbolic values," etc.--can be "embodied in different linguistic substances." (6) However, he admits that this does not occur without loss of the sounds and aesthetic effect of the original: "in translation proper the substance of the expression changes--since we are shifting from the sounds of one language to the sounds of another." (7) It's all part of the negotiation.
For it seems that the multiplicity sample could be extralinguistic; for instance, when the condition for the sentence's truth is taken to consist in there being as many Fs as fingers on my right hand.
As part of their framework for linguistically responsive teaching (LRT), Lucas and Villegas recommended four types of scaffolding practices: using extralinguistic supports, adapting written texts, adapting teacher oral language, and providing clear instructions (see Lucas & Villegas, 2011, pp.
It is necessary to differentiate between interlinguistic factors, such as English language proficiency, the predominant language of communication and thinking, L1-L2 inter-influence, and code-switching; extralinguistic factors, such as the age of onset of learning English, the length of residence in an English-speaking country, and the amount and quality of the language input; and cognitive factors, such as vocabulary learning strategies, reading fluency, and criteria of choosing incorrect collocations (the focus on the word form, meaning, both, or something else).
3) To what extent can an even wider context and the extralinguistic context reveal the equivalent extended term-embedding collocation in the target text if it turns out downright for the corpus data to do so?
He takes into account possible language-internal motivations as well as extralinguistic factors and performs statistical analyses, which substantiate, among other findings, that don't is more prominently used by teenagers than adults, and that the clause subject plays a role in the selection of third-person singular don't.
Howes (2016) described a 'sensory turn' in paradigms for literacy research, commending the 'strong focus on extracognitive and extralinguistic dimensions of literacy' (p.
Free Speech Beyond Words outlines common ground among a narrow definition of "speech," the expression of ideas through words and three types of extralinguistic communication already protected by the First Amendment--nonrepresentational art, instrumental music and nonsense.