extraliterary

extraliterary

(ˌɛkstrəˈlɪtrərɪ)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) outside of literature
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
For our Fall 2019 cover feature--which will focus on literary activism in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the Alcatraz occupation of 1969--the editors of WLT have invited 25 writers to nominate one book, published since 1969, that most influenced their extraliterary commitments, along with a brief statement explaining their choice.
As liminal interpretations developed and took root, another selective reading of Bonnin established itself--this time from a decidedly extraliterary source.
At the same time, the anaphoric search shapes debate over which of the two main characters is more sympathetic, even as, in most cases, this involves recourse to extraliterary support.
Extraliterary considerations such as the cost of paper and sales projections conspired to make Tolkien and his publisher break the single novel into three installments, but, in what might be called a ruse of literary history, Tolkien thereby became a founding father of the fantasy trilogy, which remains a popular and conventional format within the genre.
This relation enables "a different dimension" in narrative, one that presents objects in passage as "figures of thought and of speech" and thereby "reinvests the subject/object dialectic with its temporal dimension." I believe Brown sees this as a reinvestment because of the "stereoscopic effect" of his analysis, which casts "one eye on the extraliterary referent, and one on the text" (2003, 16).
By engaging scientific forecasting, Atwood takes up its designation of fiction as a technology, something we see both in Oryx and Crake and in her extraliterary writing.
Most contemporary literary scholarship treats its object as a dead fact, a colored tile, to be interpreted within the inert mosaic of the history of "ideology." New historical scholarship often revels in details but only in the interest of advancing an extraliterary narrative for the sake of which those details are generally treated with contempt.
For example, an expansion of Vittore Branca's scholarship on the Decameron's circulation--both in the extraliterary, mercantile environments of the 14th and 15th centuries and in the artistic visualizations of Boccaccio's work--could certainly benefit from the same holistic approach used in this work.
Fowler posits in his conclusion to Kinds of Literature that extraliterary events are one way in which genres change: "pastoral was obviously affected by urban development; the factory novel has some connection with the Industrial Revolution" (277).
But in 1949, responding to Irving Howe's criticism that his "obsessed" concept of Jewishness made him unable to individuate Jewish characters, Lewisohn replied on extraliterary grounds that "in a dozen languages" The Island Within "helped to sustain and comfort Jews.
Any attempt to define the aesthetic coordinates of confession is bound to encounter serious difficulties, as the realm of the notion is clearly governed by extraliterary implications.