extrametrical


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extrametrical

(ˌɛkstrəˈmɛtrɪkəl)
adj
(Poetry) poetry exceeding the number of syllables normally used in a given metre
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be made plain that the last consonant in superheavy syllables (CVC, CVCC and CVVC) is extrasyllabic or invisible word-finally since the last consonant in these types of syllables is always extrametrical. So, having a trimoraic syllable always renders the syllable inadmissible.
I have ignored the extrametrical exclamation "O, I have it!" at the end of 7.341.
(51) Milton uses 32 syllables per stanza to Horace's 39, for an ideal difference of 28 syllables, but includes an extrametrical line and two lines with feminine endings.
Traditional foot-substitution approaches capture part of the flexibility and enormous rhythmic variations between the two lines of iambic pentameter (e.g., trochaic substitution, truncated foot, extrametrical syllable).
The quick succession of questions, eleven in twenty-six lines, registers his confusion; thirty-two caesuras mark his fitful agitation; and fourteen extrametrical lines suggest his breathlessness.
Her expansive language is obvious when she responds to his glimpse of her real identity as Cordelia with the extrametrical "I am, I am," in which Fr.
An extrametrical clause-final clitic =na is associated with boundaries between fully inflected subordinate clauses and main clauses.
The opening ("Exquisite loneliness") and the inserted extrametrical long line, "And lo, your out-worn harmonies are behind me," could not have been found in Swinburne; they are distinctly Pound's own.
Most published reports suggest that the cell walls of extrametrical hyphae are the main binding sites for heavy metals in ECM fungi (Denny and Wilkins 1987; Galli et al.
Examples from Anthony and Cleopatra and Hamlet suggest that there may be a third, altogether different kind of condition under which extrametrical syllables may occur in a line: when two syllables that are to be assigned to the same position are separated by a major syntactic boundary (usually at the caesura).