extraneous

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ex·tra·ne·ous

 (ĭk-strā′nē-əs)
adj.
1. Not constituting an essential or vital element or part: school rules forbidding extraneous clothing like hats.
2. Unrelated to the topic or matter at hand. See Synonyms at irrelevant.
3. Coming from the outside: extraneous noise.

[From Latin extrāneus, from extrā, outside; see extra-.]

ex·tra′ne·ous·ly adv.
ex·tra′ne·ous·ness n.

extraneous

(ɪkˈstreɪnɪəs)
adj
1. not essential
2. not pertinent or applicable; irrelevant
3. coming from without; of external origin
4. not belonging; unrelated to that to which it is added or in which it is contained
[C17: from Latin extrāneus external, from extrā outside]
exˈtraneously adv
exˈtraneousness n

ex•tra•ne•ous

(ɪkˈstreɪ ni əs)

adj.
1. introduced or coming from without; not forming an essential or proper part: extraneous substances in our water.
2. not pertinent; irrelevant: an extraneous remark.
[1630–40; < Latin extrāneus external, foreign <extr(a)- extra-]
ex•tra′ne•ous•ly, adv.
ex•tra′ne•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extraneous - not pertinent to the matter under consideration; "an issue extraneous to the debate"; "the price was immaterial"; "mentioned several impertinent facts before finally coming to the point"
irrelevant - having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue; "an irrelevant comment"; "irrelevant allegations"
2.extraneous - not essential; "the ballet struck me as extraneous and somewhat out of keeping with the rest of the play"
extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"
3.extraneous - not belonging to that in which it is contained; introduced from an outside source; "water free of extraneous matter"; "foreign particles in milk"
adulterant, adulterating - making impure or corrupt by adding extraneous materials; "the adulterating effect of extraneous materials"
4.extraneous - coming from the outside; "extraneous light in the camera spoiled the photograph"; "relying upon an extraneous income"; "disdaining outside pressure groups"
extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"

extraneous

adjective
2. irrelevant, inappropriate, unrelated, unconnected, immaterial, beside the point, impertinent, inadmissible, off the subject, inapplicable, inapt, inapposite Let's not allow ourselves to be sidetracked by extraneous questions.
3. external, foreign, strange, alien, exotic, out of place, extrinsic, adventitious extraneous influences affecting his state of mind

extraneous

adjective
1. Not part of the essential nature of a thing:
2. Not relevant or pertinent to the subject; not applicable:
Translations

extraneous

[eksˈtreɪnɪəs] ADJ [influence] → extraño, externo; [issue] → irrelevante, superfluo
extraneous toajeno a

extraneous

[ɪkˈstreɪniəs] adj
extraneous to → étranger/ère à

extraneous

adj (form)
(= from outside) noisevon außen; influenceäußere(r, s), extern (geh); extraneous matter (Tech, Med) → Fremdstoffe pl; (solid) → Fremdkörper pl
(= not relevant) matter, material, issue, detail, thoughtirrelevant, unwesentlich; extraneous matters/issuesUnwesentliches nt; to avoid all extraneous issuesalles vermeiden, was nicht zur Sache gehört; to feel extraneous (person)sich (dat)überflüssig vorkommen; extraneous to somethingfür etw irrelevant

extraneous

[ɪksˈtreɪnɪəs] adj (frm) extraneous (to)estraneo/a (a)

ex·tra·ne·ous

a. extraño-a, sin relación con un organismo o fuera del mismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Granted, gold and silver are metals that trade on commodities markets while diamonds are gemstones that trade extraneously to commodities markets.
bothersome sense that the zombie mayhem is tacked on extraneously and
But they are lavish only in the sense of user experience, which will carry a much more meaningful impact on the life of its inhabitants than anything extraneously decorated for decorations' sake.
From Monet's Der Koch (Le Chef Pere Paul), 1882, to Daniel Spoerri's 1968 Le Coin du Restaurant Spoerri, and from Meret Oppenheim's Bon Appetit, Marcel, 1966, to Rirkrit Tiravanija's Ohne Titel (Bon voyage Monsieur Ackermann), 1995, it seems nothing will be left out or extraneously in.