extraposition


Also found in: Wikipedia.

extraposition

(ˌɛkstrəpəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. placement of something outside something else
2. (Linguistics) transformational grammar a rule that moves embedded clauses out to the end of the main clause, converting, for example, A man who will help has just arrived into A man has just arrived who will help
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The following layer deals with "the text as a complete linguistic unit" (36), which involves the information flow as presented by Halliday's theme and rheme, types of marked themes, or a number of interesting strategies related to information structure, such as voice change or extraposition (cf.
b.' V-to-T on a head-final account: movement of S to Spec, T + movement of V to T + extraposition of O
Toward a construction-based theory of language function: the case of nominal extraposition. In Language, vol.
Only 8.13% of the test takers chose the correct answer when the genitive is part of a complex sentence as is the case with the extraposition of a clausal subject: It was Tom's good idea to go swimming, while 48.00% of the students answer correctly when the genitive is found in a simple sentence: This isn't my book.
2006, The Syntax of Ke-Clause and Clausal Extraposition in Modern Persian, Austin (PhD Thesis.
Due to space limitations, the sentence-type under analysis in this paper is exclusively the one showing the order in (1): the construction that is referred to in Chomsky (2001: 25) as the rightward variant of Th/Ex (There are expected to be caught many fish, There was elected a new candidate) belongs to work in progress, though it can be advanced here that this is expected to be analysed as the result of an extraposition process applying to a configuration like (1) above.
On the syntax and semantics of PP extraposition. Linguistic Inquiry 11.
The most widespread topical pattern is OB, and indeed in Semitic in general, is topical extraposition: [12] awilum bissu biti "As for the man, his house is my house." (145:16)
(8) For such speakers, apparently, at most one phrase can be in extraposition with the indefinite article.