extravaganza

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ex·trav·a·gan·za

 (ĭk-străv′ə-găn′zə)
n.
1. An elaborate, spectacular entertainment or display: "Washington is an extravaganza of great buildings, greenery, and monuments" (Larry Griffin).
2. Music A composition marked by freedom and diversity of form, often with burlesque elements and satirical or parodic intent.

[Italian estravaganza, extravagance, from estravagante, extravagant, from Medieval Latin extrāvagāns, extrāvagant-, present participle of extrāvagārī, to wander; see extravagant.]

extravaganza

(ɪkˌstrævəˈɡænzə)
n
1. (Theatre) an elaborately staged and costumed light entertainment
2. any lavish or fanciful display, literary or other composition, etc
[C18: from Italian: extravagance]

ex•trav•a•gan•za

(ɪkˌstræv əˈgæn zə)

n., pl. -zas.
1. a production or entertainment, as a comic opera or musical comedy, with elaborate staging, costuming, and sensational effects.
2. any lavish or opulent show or event.
[1745–55; alter. of Italian (e)stravaganza extravagance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extravaganza - any lavishly staged or spectacular entertainment
entertainment, amusement - an activity that is diverting and that holds the attention

extravaganza

noun spectacular, show, spectacle, display, pageant, flight of fancy an all-night musical extravaganza
Translations

extravaganza

[eksˌtrævəˈgænzə] N (= show) → gran espectáculo m; (= film) → película f espectacular; (= building) → espectáculo m arquitectónico

extravaganza

[ɪkˌstrævəˈgænzə] n (= spectacular) → spectacle m somptueux

extravaganza

nfantastische Dichtung or (Mus) → Komposition; (= show)Ausstattungsstück nt

extravaganza

[ɪkˌstrævəˈgænzə] nrappresentazione f spettacolare
References in classic literature ?
But these extravaganzas only show that Nantucket is no Illinois.
Tarr and Professor Fether"; such bits of extravaganza as "The Devil in the Belfry" and "The Angel of the Odd"; such tales of adventure as "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym"; such papers of keen criticism and review as won for Poe the enthusiastic admiration of Charles Dickens, although they made him many enemies among the over-puffed minor American writers so mercilessly exposed by him; such poems of beauty and melody as "The Bells," "The Haunted Palace," "Tamerlane," "The City in the Sea" and "The Raven.
He didn't put on so much dog about it w'en we were alone as w'en he had the ear of a derned Spectacular Extravaganza like you.