extremeness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to extremeness: thesaurus

ex·treme

 (ĭk-strēm′)
adj.
1. Most remote in any direction; outermost or farthest: the extreme edge of the field.
2. Being in or attaining the greatest or highest degree; very intense: extreme pleasure; extreme pain.
3. Being far beyond the norm: an extreme conservative. See Synonyms at excessive.
4. Of the greatest severity; drastic: took extreme measures to conserve fuel.
5. Biology
a. Characterized by severe, usually oxygen-poor environmental conditions.
b. Having an affinity for such conditions: an extreme microorganism.
6. Sports
a. Very dangerous or difficult: extreme rafting.
b. Participating or tending to participate in a very dangerous or difficult sport: an extreme skier.
7. Archaic Final; last.
n.
1. The greatest or utmost degree or point.
2. Either of the two things situated at opposite ends of a range: the extremes of boiling and freezing.
3. An extreme condition.
4. An immoderate, drastic expedient: resorted to extremes in the emergency.
5. Mathematics
a. The first or last term of a ratio or a series.
b. A maximum or minimum value of a function.
6. Logic The major or minor term of a syllogism.
Idiom:
in the extreme
To an extreme degree: eccentric in the extreme.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin extrēmus; see eghs in Indo-European roots.]

ex·treme′ly adv.
ex·treme′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extremeness - the quality of being extreme
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
References in classic literature ?
It was, however, the only book immediately at hand; and I indulged a vague hope that the excitement which now agitated the hypochondriac, might find relief (for the history of mental disorder is full of similar anomalies) even in the extremeness of the folly which I should read.
The principle of extremeness aversion (213) suggests that many consumers might gravitate toward Level 5 policies: the central location of the number 5 on a 10-point scale would likely imbue it with a patina of moderation.
(104) Simonson, supra note 103, at 161-62; Itamar Simonson & Amos Tversky, Choice in Context: Tradeoff Contrast and Extremeness Aversion, 29 J.
In Stoner's original data, researchers noticed that the largest risky shifts could be found when group members "had a quite extreme risky initial position," in the sense that the predeliberation votes were weighted toward the risky end, whereas the items "that shifted a little or not at all started out near the middle of the scale."(68) Thus the direction of the shift seemed to turn on the location of the original disposition, and the size of the shift depended on the extremeness of that original disposition.
__________ and Amos Tversky (1992), "Choice in Context: Tradeoff Contrast and Extremeness Aversion," Journal of Marketing Research, 29 (August): 281--295.
is not sufficient." (99) At least indirectly, therefore, act reasonableness is already embedded in the current standard's emphasis on both the extremeness of the required emotion and the seriousness of the required provocation.
The phenomena of "tradeoff contrast" and "extremeness aversion" may well play a large role in jury determination.
It is against this background that we should understand Neal Katyal's important article.12 Katyal's insightful account of how the phenomenon of substitution can confound conventional deterrence prescriptions employs a host of innovative concepts -- including Giffen goods, income effects, and extremeness aversion -- that the new deterrence scholarship should aspire to appropriate.
Levity Crop Science from the UK will present Indra, a product that helps crops withstand stress salinity, temperature extremeness and high UV which can reverse yield loss.
The main difference in their approach is over the optimal level of extremeness. Al Qaeda Central leadership believes that a certain measure of restraint is advantageous.
Modeled after the Court's one person, one vote doctrine, the approach would require that a plaintiff show that partisan purpose rather than legitimate state interests accounts for the gerrymander's partisan characteristics, independent of their extremeness. I address potential criticisms from opposite directions that this approach goes too far and that it does not go far enough.