extremity

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ex·trem·i·ty

 (ĭk-strĕm′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. ex·trem·i·ties
1. The outermost or farthest point or portion: at the extremity of the peninsula.
2. The greatest or utmost degree: the extremity of despair.
3. Grave danger, necessity, or distress: people in extremity.
4. An extreme or severe measure: had to resort to extremities in the crisis.
5.
a. A bodily limb: She is in a wheelchair because of weakness of the lower extremities.
b. extremities The hands and feet: Frostbite affects the extremities first.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

extremity

(ɪkˈstrɛmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the farthest or outermost point or section; termination
2. the greatest or most intense degree
3. an extreme condition or state, as of adversity or disease
4. (Anatomy) a limb, such as a leg, arm, or wing, or the part of such a limb farthest from the trunk
5. (usually plural) archaic a drastic or severe measure
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•trem•i•ty

(ɪkˈstrɛm ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the extreme or terminal point, limit, or part of something.
2. a limb of the body.
3. Usu., extremities. the end part of a limb, as a hand or foot.
4. Often, extremities. a condition of extreme need or danger.
5. an utmost degree: the extremity of joy.
6. a drastic measure or effort: to go to any extremity to succeed.
7. extreme character: the extremity of his views.
8. a person's last moment before death.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extremity - an external body part that projects from the bodyextremity - an external body part that projects from the body; "it is important to keep the extremities warm"
chelicera - either of the first pair of fang-like appendages near the mouth of an arachnid; often modified for grasping and piercing
mouthpart - any part of the mouth of an insect or other arthropod especially one adapted to a specific way of feeding
fang - an appendage of insects that is capable of injecting venom; usually evolved from the legs
chela, nipper, pincer, claw - a grasping structure on the limb of a crustacean or other arthropods
parapodium - one of a pair of fleshy appendages of a polychete annelid that functions in locomotion and breathing
fin - organ of locomotion and balance in fishes and some other aquatic animals
pleopod, swimmeret - one of the paired abdominal appendages of certain aquatic crustaceans that function primarily for carrying the eggs in females and are usually adapted for swimming
external body part - any body part visible externally
limb - one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper
dactyl, digit - a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
2.extremity - an extreme condition or state (especially of adversity or disease)
adversity, hard knocks, hardship - a state of misfortune or affliction; "debt-ridden farmers struggling with adversity"; "a life of hardship"
bitter end - the final extremity (however unpleasant it may be); "he was determined to fight to the bitter end"
3.extremity - the greatest or utmost degree; "the extremity of despair"
ultimacy, ultimateness - the state or degree of being ultimate; the final or most extreme in degree or size or time or distance, "the ultimacy of these social values"
4.extremity - the outermost or farthest region or point
boundary, bounds, bound - the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
extreme point, extremum, extreme - the point located farthest from the middle of something
limit - as far as something can go
region, part - the extended spatial location of something; "the farming regions of France"; "religions in all parts of the world"; "regions of outer space"
5.extremity - that part of a limb that is farthest from the torso
external body part - any body part visible externally
limb - one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper
pedal extremity, vertebrate foot - the extremity of the limb in vertebrates
hand, manus, mitt, paw - the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb; "he had the hands of a surgeon"; "he extended his mitt"
finger - any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb); "her fingers were long and thin"
toe - one of the digits of the foot
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

extremity

noun
1. limit, end, edge, border, top, tip, bound, minimum, extreme, maximum, pole, margin, boundary, terminal, frontier, verge, brink, rim, brim, pinnacle, termination, nadir, zenith, apex, terminus, apogee, farthest point, furthest point, acme a small port on the north-western extremity of the island
2. depth, height, excess, climax, consummation, acuteness his lack of restraint in the extremity of his grief
3. crisis, trouble, emergency, disaster, setback, pinch, plight, hardship, adversity, dire straits, exigency, extreme suffering Even in extremity, she never lost her sense of humour.
plural noun
1. hands and feet, limbs, fingers and toes Rheumatoid arthritis affects the extremities and limbs.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

extremity

noun
A highly volatile dangerous situation requiring immediate remedial action:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أطراف الجِسِمدرجَه قُصْوىضيق، شَدَّهطَرَف
končetina
elendighedfødderhænderlemyderlighed
szélsőségvégletvégtag
hámark, hæsta stigneyî, hörmungarútlimirystu mörk
najvyššia miera
extremitet
aşırı dereceel ve ayaklartehlikeli durum

extremity

[ɪksˈtremɪtɪ] N
1. (= end) (usu pl) → extremo m, punta f
2. (fig) [of despair etc] → extremo m
in his extremity, he went to her for helpante la necesidad, acudió a ella en busca de ayuda
3. extremities (Anat) → extremidades fpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

extremity

[ɪkˈstrɛmɪti]
n
(= furthest part) → extrémité f
(= severity) [climate, situation] → dureté f extremities
npl (= hands and feet) → extrémités fpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

extremity

n
(= furthest point)äußerstes Ende; at the northerly extremity of the continentam nördlichsten Zipfel des Kontinents
extremities pl (= hands and feet)Extremitäten pl
(= extreme degree) in the extremity of his despairin tiefster or äußerster Verzweiflung
(= state of need, distress)Not f; he was reduced to the extremity of having to sell his businesser musste zum äußersten Mittel schreiten und sein Geschäft verkaufen
(= extreme actions) to resort to extremitieszu äußersten or extremen Mitteln greifen; to drive somebody to extremitiesjdn zum Äußersten treiben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

extremity

[ɪksˈtrɛmɪtɪ] n (gen) → estremità f inv (fig) (of despair) → culmine
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

extreme

(ikˈstriːm) adjective
1. very great, especially much more than usual. extreme pleasure; He is in extreme pain.
2. very far or furthest in any direction, especially out from the centre. the extreme south-western tip of England; Politically, he belongs to the extreme left.
3. very violent or strong; not ordinary or usual. He holds extreme views on education.
noun
1. something as far, or as different, as possible from something else. the extremes of sadness and joy.
2. the greatest degree of any state, especially if unpleasant. The extremes of heat in the desert make life uncomfortable.
exˈtremely adverb
very. extremely kind.
exˈtremism noun
the holding of views which are as far from being moderate as possible.
exˈtremist noun, adjective
exˈtremity (-ˈstre-) plural exˈtremities noun
1. the farthest point. The two poles represent the extremities of the earth's axis.
2. an extreme degree; the quality of being extreme. Their suffering reached such extremities that many died.
3. a situation of great danger or distress. They need help in this extremity.
4. the parts of the body furthest from the middle eg the hands and feet.
in the extreme
very. dangerous in the extreme.
to extremes
very far, especially further than is thought to be reasonable. She can never express an opinion without going to extremes.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ex·trem·i·ty

n. extremidad, parte terminal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

extremity

n (pl -ties) extremidad f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
In the middle of the concave side, there is a groove twelve inches deep, in which the extremities of the axle are lodged, and turned round as there is occasion.
When the stone is put parallel to the plane of the horizon, the island stands still; for in that case the extremities of it, being at equal distance from the earth, act with equal force, the one in drawing downwards, the other in pushing upwards, and consequently no motion can ensue.
For if a Soldier is a wedge, a Woman is a needle; being, so to speak, ALL point, at least at the two extremities. Add to this the power of making herself practically invisible at will, and you will perceive that a Female, in Flatland, is a creature by no means to be trifled with.
One day, being discoursing with her on the extremities they suffered, I asked her if she could describe, by what she had felt, what it was to starve, and how it appeared?
But if it be asked how it happens that the blood in the veins, flowing in this way continually into the heart, is not exhausted, and why the arteries do not become too full, since all the blood which passes through the heart flows into them, I need only mention in reply what has been written by a physician 1 of England, who has the honor of having broken the ice on this subject, and of having been the first to teach that there are many small passages at the extremities of the arteries, through which the blood received by them from the heart passes into the small branches of the veins, whence it again returns to the heart; so that its course amounts precisely to a perpetual circulation.
And what more need be adduced to explain nutrition, and the production of the different humors of the body, beyond saying, that the force with which the blood, in being rarefied, passes from the heart towards the extremities of the arteries, causes certain of its parts to remain in the members at which they arrive, and there occupy the place of some others expelled by them; and that according to the situation, shape, or smallness of the pores with which they meet, some rather than others flow into certain parts, in the same way that some sieves are observed to act, which, by being variously perforated, serve to separate different species of grain?
After having borne all sorts of affronts and ill-treatments, we retired to our house at Fremona, in the midst of our countrymen, who had been settling round about us a long time, imagining we should be more secure there, and that, at least during the life of the Emperor, they would not come to extremities, or proceed to open force.
Our Portuguese therefore thought that, without staying till the last extremities, they might lawfully repel one violence by another, and sallying out to the number of fifty, wounded about three score of the Abyssins, and had put them to the sword but that they feared it might bring too great an odium upon our cause.
William rose, casting a tranquil glance over the enthusiastic crowd, and his keen eyes rested by turns on the three extremities of a triangle formed opposite to him by three persons of very different interests and feelings.
In pronouncing these words, the Prince, to judge of the effect they produced, surveyed with his eagle eye the three extremities of the triangle.
The clamorous noises again rushed down the island; and before Duncan had time to recover from the shock, his feeble barrier of brush was scattered to the winds, the cavern was entered at both its extremities, and he and his companions were dragged from their shelter and borne into the day, where they stood surrounded by the whole band of the triumphant Hurons.
There is something at all times commanding in honest indignation, and Hiram did not stay to provoke the wrath of the old hunter to extremities. When the intruder was out of sight, Natty proceeded to the hut, where he found all quiet as the grave.