extremophile


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ex·tre·mo·phile

 (ĭk-strē′mə-fīl′)
n.
Any of various organisms that require extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, or chemical concentration, as in very cold or salty environments, in order to thrive.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

extremophile

(ɪkˈstrɛməˌfaɪl)
n
(Microbiology) a microbe that lives in an environment once thought to be uninhabitable, for example in boiling or frozen water
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
ekstremofiili
extrêmophile
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References in periodicals archive ?
The DNA that codes for the enzyme is unlike the DNA for any known cellulase; it was traced back to a never-before-seen extremophile. "It's very strange to find one that doesn't fit into a well-defined category," Graham says.
SampleMatrix is based on extremophile biology in which organisms can survive long-term in a state of anhydrobiosis (life without water) and later be revived by rehydration.
The slideshows give an overall understanding of the extremophile research and the other sections provide excellent details and extend the information presented in the slideshows.
However, an enzyme from an extremophile survives the process.
In real life, organisms with similar traits exist, such as the "extremophile" red alga Galdieria sulphuraria.
They currently are investigating which already-known exoplanets potentially might host extremophile life or habitable moons.
One such extremophile, Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, lives in Mono's mud without sunlight, getting energy from sulfates and other inorganic compounds.
If life began in extremophile conditions, as heat-loving archaea suggest, did life have to struggle hard to adapt to the radically different Earth of today?
Microbacterium hatanonis, an unusual "extremophile" (organisms inhabiting extreme environments).
Kane and Gelino are hard at work determining which already-discovered exoplanets might be candidates for extremophile life or habitable moons.